Snow CHAOS sweeps across Britain: Will my employer pay me if I can't make it to work?

Commuting to work is impossible in some cases when adverse conditions hit.
Commuting to work is impossible in some cases when adverse conditions hit.

Public transport is often delayed or cancelled as a result of the adverse conditions

Published

As snow sets in and temperatures dip across the UK, commuting to work has become an impossible task for many.

Public transport is often delayed or cancelled as a result of the adverse conditions, and motorists may struggle with getting off their driveways.

People will be in the dark as to what their employee rights are during days affected by snow.

A solicitor from Nelsons has now outlined where you stand in these situations.

Laura Kearsley, from the employment team at the company, told The Sun that there is no automatic legal right to be paid if you are unable to go to work due to bad weather.

Employers can say your absence is unauthorised, even if the circumstances are out of your control.

Annual leave may be granted in some circumstances.
Annual leave may be granted in some circumstances.

Getting to work is regarded as the employees’ responsibility, but exceptions can be made if your company provide transport which is cancelled, such as a bus service.

Annual leave may be allowed by some employers to cover the snow day, and it may even be possible to work from home.

However, you must not allow your employer to force or pressure you to attempt the journey if there are legitimate safety concerns involved with travelling.

If your workplace is closed due to adverse conditions, you will still be paid for the time it is closed.

You should be awarded your usual rate if you are able to work and travel in, but your bosses have closed your place of work.

If you are on a zero-hours contract or your employer has a contractual right to decline to offer you work at short notice, this may not be the case.

It is therefore important to check your contract as it may contain clauses regarding specific arrangements for snow days, as some employers may ask you to work from home if this is possible.