Motorists warned of £1,000 fine for making common mistake when allowing ambulances to pass

There are a number of manoeuvres which the would break one of the Highway Codes, despite adhering to another.
There are a number of manoeuvres which the would break one of the Highway Codes, despite adhering to another.

Under the Highway Code, drivers should give way to vehicles such as ambulances, fire engines and police cars

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Drivers could face a fine of up to £1,000 if they fail to properly follow the Highway Code when allowing an ambulance to overtake them on the road.

It is common for motorists to cater to emergency services and their need to get to patients and hospitals, but if they perform an illegal manoeuvre in the process they could see themselves slapped with a heavy fine.

Drivers could face a fine of up to £1,000 if they fail to properly follow the Highway Code
Drivers could face a fine of up to £1,000 if they fail to properly follow the Highway Code

Under the Highway Code, drivers should give way to vehicles such as ambulances, fire engines and police cars.

But there are a number of manoeuvres which the would still break one of the Highway Codes, despite adhering to another.

Stopping in a yellow bus stop, entering a bus stop or going through a red light are all offences.

Rule 219 of the Highway Code states: “You should look and listen for ambulances, fire engines, police, doctors or other emergency vehicles using flashing blue, red or green lights and sirens, or flashing headlights, or traffic officer and incident support vehicles using flashing amber lights.

Stopping in a yellow bus stop, entering a bus stop or going through a red light are all offences.
Stopping in a yellow bus stop, entering a bus stop or going through a red light are all offences.

“When one approaches do not panic. Consider the route of such a vehicle and take appropriate action to let it pass, while complying with all traffic signs.

“If necessary, pull to the side of the road and stop, but try to avoid stopping before the brow of a hill, a bend or narrow section of road.

“Do not endanger yourself, other road users or pedestrians and avoid mounting the kerb.”

Speaking to The Sun, RAC said: “Keep driving until there’s a suitable place to pull over and use your common sense to avoid coming into conflict with other road users.”