Motorists warned of £1,000 fine for common mistake while driving this winter

Driving in bad weather causes over a thousand injuries a year and four fatalities in the UK.
Driving in bad weather causes over a thousand injuries a year and four fatalities in the UK.

As temperatures drop and the nights draw in, winter can pose both a challenge and a danger for drivers

Published Last updated

Drivers have been warned that they could receive a £1,000 fine and points on their licence if they break one simple rule during bad weather.

As temperatures drop and the nights draw in, winter can pose both a challenge and a danger for drivers.

Motorists could see themselves slammed with nasty fines and licence points if they are caught not driving correctly.
Motorists could see themselves slammed with nasty fines and licence points if they are caught not driving correctly.

Driving in bad weather causes over a thousand injuries a year and four fatalities in the UK.

Motorists could see themselves slammed with nasty fines and licence points if they are caught not driving correctly.

Research by the tyre company ATS Euromaster revealed that one little known rule could land you out of pocket entering the festive season.

In order to stop windows from fogging up and obscuring your view, leaving the air conditioning on is crucial.

Sprayable de-icer and an ice scraper should be must-haves to carry in your car over winter as well.

Rule 229 of the Highway Code says drivers must ensure they have clear visibility before setting off, this includes clearing any ice or snow from the windows.

Research by the tyre company ATS Euromaster revealed that one little known rule could land you out of pocket entering the festive season.
Research by the tyre company ATS Euromaster revealed that one little known rule could land you out of pocket entering the festive season.

Mist and condensation on windows also poses a risk as drivers are unable to safely view the road.

Visibility also extends to making sure your lights are clean – it’s worth wiping them every now and again to maximise vision – while never setting off if your windows are fogged up or still covered in ice or snow.