One Britain One Nation founder defends singing of patriotic song in schools

“They want to celebrate unity. They want to celebrate pride. They want every child to feel part of this country,” Kash Singh told GB News presenters Colin Brazier and Mercy Muroki.

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The founder of One Britain One Nation (OBON) said he can't comprehend how the singing of a patriotic song in schools has received a negative backlash on social media.

One Britain One Nation (OBON) Day is due to be celebrated in schools on Friday, after the campaign was founded by retired police inspector Kash Singh. The Government has supported the campaign, which aims to instil pride in Britain through a celebratory day this week.

Mr Singh came to the UK as a child, and has now set up an organisation to try and bring people from diverse cultural backgrounds together to celebrate a common British identity.

"We've got kids now in this country from all parts of the world, and we need them to feel part of this great country, so that every child has a strong shared sense of belonging," he said to GB News presenters Colin Brazier and Mercy Muroki.

However, the initative has come under criticism from those who don't think kids should be asked to sing patriotic songs. Some have even compared the song to North Korean and Nazi propaganda on social media.

"The reaction on Twitter, it's unjustified," said Mr Singh. "I can't comprehend how we've received that kind of reaction from the work that we do."

Mr Singh added that "it was our children who wrote that song," because "they want to celebrate unity. They want to celebrate pride. They want every child to feel part of this country."