Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have OBLITERATED their right to privacy with book release and Netflix series

Prince Harry has obliterated any future claims of a right to privacy following the long awaited release of his book ‘Spare’.
Prince Harry has obliterated any future claims of a right to privacy following the long awaited release of his book ‘Spare’.

Prince Harry has detailed a number of private encounters in his book 'Spare' which was leaked in Spain this week

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Prince Harry has obliterated any future claims of a right to privacy following the long awaited release of his book ‘Spare’.

The book which is due to be released early next week leaked when a number of Spanish bookshops put it out on their shelves early.

Harry reveals that he used cocaine and that William and Kate encouraged him to wear a Nazi uniform to a fancy dress party.
Harry reveals that he used cocaine and that William and Kate encouraged him to wear a Nazi uniform to a fancy dress party.

It features a number of bombshell claims including a story in which the Duke of Sussex claims his brother William physically attacked him.

He writes: “(William) called me another name, then came at me. It all happened so fast. So very fast. He grabbed me by the collar, ripping my necklace, and he knocked me to the floor.

“I landed on the dog’s bowl, which cracked under my back, the pieces cutting into me. I lay there for a moment, dazed, then got to my feet and told him to get out.”

Elsewhere he reveals that he used cocaine and that William and Kate encouraged him to wear a Nazi uniform to a fancy dress party.

The revelations mean that Harry and Meghan could find it difficult to defend their claim to a right of privacy in the press in the future.
The revelations mean that Harry and Meghan could find it difficult to defend their claim to a right of privacy in the press in the future.

The book goes on to give an insight into a series of private conversations between senior members of the Royal Family.

Harry and Meghan Markle are estimated to have made over $100million between their Netflix deals and Harry’s book.

The revelations mean that Harry and Meghan could find it difficult to defend their claim to a right of privacy in the press in the future.

A large factor judges take into account when reviewing privacy claims is how much the claimants have shared their personal lives in the public.

Speaking to Press Gazette a tabloid executive said: “You can’t write about losing your virginity and in the next breath complain about lack of privacy. Suspect a) paps will now be a regular fixture again wherever he goes and b) UK pix desks will start buying and publishing safe in the knowledge he won’t be able to claim privacy.”