Nigel Farage SLAMS Ngozi Fulani over royal race row - 'Planned this from the very start!'

The GB News presenter accused Fulani of having an 'anti-British' agenda

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Nigel Farage says Ngozi Fulani has an “anti-British” agenda after sparking a royal race row.

Fulani, founder of the charity Sistah Space, expressed shock at her treatment by the late Queen’s lady in waiting, Lady Susan Hussey, but said she had yet to be contacted by Buckingham Palace to discuss the incident.

Lady Susan Hussey, Prince William’s 83-year-old godmother, resigned from the household and apologised after she repeatedly challenged Ms Fulani when she said she was British at the Queen Consort’s reception highlighting violence against women and girls.

Now, GB News’ Nigel Farage has criticised the charity boss, accusing her of “planning this from the very start”.

Speaking on Farage at Large, live from Llandudno, he said: “Lady Susan Hussey was a lady in waiting to our late Queen and reportedly one of her best friends.

“She has given six decades of service to this country.

“At an event last night at Buckingham Palace, there was a woman in full African dress.

“Lady Hussey, perhaps not surprisingly, asked her where she came from. She got a series of non-replies and pursued the conversation.

Nigel Farage has accused Fulani of being a 'Marxist'.
Nigel Farage has accused Fulani of being a 'Marxist'.

“In the end, it turns out Fulani, who is a British citizen, although of African heritage and still displaying African culture, it turns out she said she felt she had been denied her nationality in what was seen to be an outright racist assault.

“I thought immediately, something doesn’t feel right here.”

The GB News presenter says the charity owner “clearly had a tape recorder”, which suggests she “planned this right from the very start”.

“She’s an anti-Royal, anti-British Marxist. It’s quite wrong what has happened in the last 24 hours”, he said.

Rishi Sunak was asked about the accusations, saying racism must be “confronted” as Buckingham Palace faces a storm over the comments.

Speaking to broadcasters in Downing Street, he said: “As I’ve talked about in the past, I have experienced racism in my life.

“But what I am pleased to say is some of the things that I experienced when I was a kid and a young person I don’t think would happen today because our country has made incredible progress in tackling racism.

Nigel Farage says the charity founder 'clearly had a tape recorder'.
Nigel Farage says the charity founder 'clearly had a tape recorder'.

“But the job is never done. And that’s why whenever we see it we must confront it.

“It’s right that we continually learn the lessons and move to a better future.”

Mr Sunak, who became leader of the Conservative Party in October following Liz Truss’s resignation, is the UK’s first Hindu Prime Minister and the first of Asian heritage.

He told broadcasters it would not be “right” for him to comment on the matter, but said: “As we’ve all seen, they’ve acknowledged what’s happened and made an apology for it.”

William, who is on a trip to Boston in the US with the Princess of Wales, backed the decision of his godmother to resign as a Lady of the Household.

A Kensington Palace spokesman issued a strong statement, saying: “Racism has no place in our society.

“The comments were unacceptable, and it is right that the individual has stepped aside with immediate effect.”

The Palace moved swiftly to respond to Ms Fulani’s tweets on Wednesday morning, saying it took the incident at Tuesday’s reception “extremely seriously” and had investigated immediately.

It added, not naming Lady Susan, that the individual concerned had resigned and apologised and that the comments were “unacceptable and deeply regrettable”.

The King, who acceded to the throne less than three months ago, and Camilla have been made aware of the situation, the Palace said.

But former BBC royal correspondent Peter Hunt told the PA news agency: “Charles and William’s problem is that the focus is already shifting from the actions of one woman to broader questions about whether Buckingham Palace is institutionally racist.”