Ngozi Fulani says she has received ‘HORRIFIC' abuse online after Palace remarks

Ngozi Fulani told GB News last week that she had been 'denied' her nationality by Lady Susan Hussey
Ngozi Fulani told GB News last week that she had been 'denied' her nationality by Lady Susan Hussey

Ngozi Fulani told GB News last week that she had been 'denied' her nationality by Lady Susan Hussey

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A black domestic abuse campaigner asked where she “really came from” at a Buckingham Palace royal reception said she has suffered “horrific abuse” on social media.

Ngozi Fulani, founder of the charity Sistah Space, expressed shock at her treatment by the late Queen’s lady in waiting, Lady Susan Hussey.

Queen Elizabeth II (left), and her then lady in waiting, Lady Susan Hussey.
Queen Elizabeth II (left), and her then lady in waiting, Lady Susan Hussey.

She said her family has been under “immense pressure” but has been “heartened” by messages of support since the incident.

In a statement issued on Monday, Ms Fulani said: “The last week has been an extremely difficult time for us all at Sistah Space.

“My team, family and I have been put under immense pressure and received some horrific abuse via social media.

“Yet throughout this time I have been heartened by the huge amount of support we have received.

“I want to thank everyone for that, and it has shown me that love will always triumph over hate.”

Lady Susan, the Prince of Wales’s 83-year-old godmother, resigned from the household and apologised after she repeatedly challenged Ms Fulani when she said she was British at the Queen Consort’s reception highlighting violence against women and girls.

Ngozi Fulani said she was "denied" her nationality during an encounter with Lady Susan Hussey.

Joining Mark Longhurst on GB News, the chief executive of Sistah Space recalled her experience.

Ngozi Fulani said she was "denied" her nationality during encounter with Lady Susan Hussey.
Ngozi Fulani said she was "denied" her nationality during encounter with Lady Susan Hussey.

She said: “This happened over about five or six minutes. So when she asked where I'm from, I said Sistah Space, because obviously it's about domestic abuse and there are a lot of agencies there.

“So I thought she meant where are you from in terms of who you representing? Then she said, ‘no, where are you from?’

“And so we said Hackney, because that's where we're based. And then she said, ‘Where are you from?’

"So I said, ‘me? I'm born here.

“So this went on. I mean, if you want to find out something about somebody, you ask a question once or twice, once you've got the answer, you move on, right?

“And because this whole thing is about domestic abuse, there were other questions, but the first thing she did as well is to take my hair and move it out of the way.

“That's the first thing. No hello, no nothing, and I've never done that.

“I really think that we need to respect people's personal space.”

Ms Fulani added in her statement: “It has been an emotional whirlwind and we now wish to take the time to pause, reflect and learn from these events.”