Ngozi Fulani offers to visit Buckingham Palace to educate the royal family on 'cultural competency'

Last week, Ms Fulani told GB News that she had been “denied her nationality” during her encounter with Lady Susan Hussey.
Last week, Ms Fulani told GB News that she had been “denied her nationality” during her encounter with Lady Susan Hussey.

Ngozi Fulani has said she would go to the palace if it meant positive change was made that could 'save lives'

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Ngozi Fulani has said she will go to Buckingham Palace to raise awareness of “cultural competency”.

The domestic violence campaigner has said she would go to the palace if it meant positive change was made that could “save lives”.

Last week, Ms Fulani told GB News that she had been “denied her nationality” during her encounter with Lady Susan Hussey.

Ms Fulani says she would go to Buckingham Palace to raise awareness of “cultural competency”.
Ms Fulani says she would go to Buckingham Palace to raise awareness of “cultural competency”.

Speaking with GB News’ Mark Longhurst, the founder of the charity Sistah Space, expressed her shock at her treatment by the late Queen’s lady in waiting.

She said: “It's not acceptable and although it's uncomfortable for people to hear, trust me, it's much more uncomfortable to be in a space and being denied your nationality until they get the answer they want.

“So I'm very clear this wasn't somebody being curious because I'm about that, this was something different.”

Lady Hussey resigned as a result and a Kensington Palace spokesman issued a strong statement, saying: “Racism has no place in our society.

Queen Elizabeth II, and her lady in waiting, Lady Susan Hussey arrive at St Mary Magdalene Church, on the royal estate at Sandringham in Norfolk.
Queen Elizabeth II, and her lady in waiting, Lady Susan Hussey arrive at St Mary Magdalene Church, on the royal estate at Sandringham in Norfolk.

“The comments were unacceptable, and it is right that the individual has stepped aside with immediate effect.”

In a statement released on Monday, Ms Fulani said: “What took place at the event is now well-documented, and sadly is something that occurs on an all too regular basis,” she said.

“Incidents like this not only cause emotional harm to those involved but do also have wider repercussions within the community.

“I have experienced first-hand what happens when a black woman faces adversity and has to overcome additional barriers when trying to report it. This is at the heart of what we do at Sistah Space, and it has reiterated to me just how important the work we do is.

“I remain dedicated to raising awareness around cultural competency, and will go to Buckingham Palace, or anywhere else, if it will help raise positive change and save lives.

“It has been an emotional whirlwind and we now wish to take the time to pause, reflect and learn from these events.”