Meghan and Harry are like a volcano SPEWING resentment - Dr David Starkey launches savage attack on Duke and Duchess of Sussex

The historian told Nigel Farage that Harry and Meghan could face banishment

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King Charles’ decision to snub Harry and Meghan from his historic Christmas Day address has been celebrated by Dr David Starkey.

Historian Dr David Starkey
Historian Dr David Starkey

Speaking to Nigel Farage on GB News, the historian said that banishment of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex could be an option: “Until there’s a reconciliation, which seems infinitely unlikely, the answer is yes. And do you know what? I think rightly so.

“They have played the game, a footsy game of one foot in, one foot out. You can’t do it.

“It was done as it were by silence, it wasn’t done by explicit banishment. This is not the treatment of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. But you know what? It may eventually have to be.”

After Nigel Farage said Harry and Meghan have now “said all they have said:,” Dr Starkey replied: “A tiny speck of grievance becomes this Vesuvius of resentment. It’s an extraordinary achievement.

“It’s a kind of genius, but it’s a really destructive genius.

“I used to make the joke that Harry had married his mother. Unfortunately, he married his mother with all the destructive aspects of Diana and none of the constructive ones.

"It’s a horrible, painful parody, that relationship, and profoundly damaging."

The King has used his first Christmas broadcast to sympathise with families struggling with the cost-of-living crisis and praise individuals, charities and faith groups supporting those in need.

Dr David Starkey speaking to Nigel Farage
Dr David Starkey speaking to Nigel Farage

Charles spoke about the “great anxiety and hardship” experienced by many trying to “pay their bills and keep their families fed and warm” during his televised message, which featured footage of a food bank and other scenes of meals being distributed to the homeless.

The country is grappling with an economic crisis due in part to the war in Ukraine and the monarch also praised volunteers, paying tribute to the “wonderfully kind people” who donated food or their time.

Charles noted in his speech how his son, William, the heir to the throne, and William's wife, Kate, had visited Wales recently, "shining a light" on examples of community spirit.

But he made no mention of William's brother, Harry, or his wife, Meghan, who took part in a documentary this month in which the couple portrayed the royal family as a tone-deaf institution unconcerned about their mental well-being. Harry and Meghan also recounted how they had stepped back from their royal roles in 2020 after a slew of negative press coverage.