King Charles III owns 'pitiful object that goes everywhere' with him and portrays 'childhood loneliness'

Prince Harry labelled Charles's Teddy a 'pitiful object'
Prince Harry labelled Charles's Teddy a 'pitiful object'

The Duke of Sussex claimed the object epitomises his father's childhood loneliness

Published

King Charles carries a teddy bear he has had since he was a child everywhere he goes according to an extract in Prince Harry's autobiography.

Prince Harry described his father's treasured companion as “a pitiful object”.

He added regarding the teddy bear: “With broken arms and dangly threads, holes patched up here and there...Teddy expressed eloquently, better than Pa ever could, the essential loneliness of his childhood.”

Prince Harry goes on to say that he and Prince William vowed to welcome Camilla into the family for their dad.

Prince Harry criticised Charles's wife in his autobiography
Prince Harry criticised Charles's wife in his autobiography

The Duke of Sussex said: “Apologies to Teddy, Pa deserved a proper companion.

"That was why, when asked, Willy and I promised Pa that we’d welcome Camilla into the family.”

Prince Harry divulges details of his at times strained relationship with Camilla throughout his autobiography.

The Duke of Sussex wrote regarding King Charles choosing to move on with Camilla: “He had asked my grandmother for permission and she had grudgingly granted it, according to what was published.

"In spite of Willy and I begging him not to, my father proceeded with his plan.

"We shook him by the hand and wished him all the best without hard feelings.

"We recognised that he was going to be with the woman he always loved, the woman that fate had in store for him from the beginning.”

Harry continued: “I knew without a doubt that this marriage would drive our father away from us not in a literal sense, not in a deliberate or malicious way, but still... I would push him away.

Charles and Camilla got married in 2005
Charles and Camilla got married in 2005

"My father was entering a new space, a closed space, a strictly insular space.

"I sensed that Willy and I would see our father less and that made me feel mixed emotions.

“I wasn’t happy about losing a second parent and I didn’t know how to feel about having a step-mother who I thought had sacrificed me on her public relations altar."

He added: "What I wanted in spite of everything was my father to be happy. Oddly enough I wanted Camilla to be happy. Maybe she was less dangerous when she was happy?”