King Charles' birthday snub to Prince Andrew 'no coincidence at all'

King Charles opted to widen the number of Counsellors of State, reducing the chance of Prince Andrew ever having to carry out constitutional roles.
King Charles opted to widen the number of Counsellors of State, reducing the chance of Prince Andrew ever having to carry out constitutional roles.

The King announced he would be 'most content' to widen the pool of Counsellors of State

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King Charles snubbing Prince Andrew on his first birthday as monarch was “no coincidence”, according to a royal expert.

The monarch yesterday announced he would be “most content” to widen the number of Counsellors of State.

Prince Andrew has seen his chance of taking up constitutional duties in Charles' absence reduce significantly.
Prince Andrew has seen his chance of taking up constitutional duties in Charles' absence reduce significantly.

Those who have the role bestowed upon them are able to carry out constitutional roles in his absence.

The Earl of Wessex and the Princess Royal are now able to take on the royal role. Princes Harry and Andrew were previously the only figures who had the status.

Mr Fitzwilliams told the Mirror: "This is a very good example of King Charles making an extremely sensible necessary decision, very early in his reign and the fact it's announced on his birthday is no accident.

"The news breaking on his birthday says it all.

"Since Andrew is in disgrace and that is most unlikely to change, the situation had been perilous."

He continued: "Public opinion is solidly against Andrew and there is absolutely no chance according to all reports.

“The King is absolute on the issue and so is Prince William. That is that."

Prince Harry is also likely to feel snubbed by the change, Angela Levin told The Sun.

Prince Harry is also a Counsellor of State, but as a non-working royal, Charles has looked to reduce his chances of ever having to carry out constitutional roles.
Prince Harry is also a Counsellor of State, but as a non-working royal, Charles has looked to reduce his chances of ever having to carry out constitutional roles.

Writing to the House of Lords, King Charles said he would be "most content" if the number of Counsellors of State "be increased to include my brother and sister, the Princess Royal and Earl of Wessex."

The statement read: "To ensure continued efficiency of public business when I'm unavailable, such as while I'm undertaking official duties overseas, I confirm that I would be most content should Parliament see fit for the number of people who may be called upon to act as counsellors of State under the terms of the Regency acts 1937 to 1963 to be increased to include my sister and brother, the Princess Royal, and the Earl of Wessex and Forfar. Both of whom have previously undertaken this role."

While Harry and Andrew remain Counsellors of State under British law, the pair are no longer working royals.

Due to this, the House of Lords called for a “sensible amendment” in October.

Harry lives 5,000-miles away with wife Meghan Markle in California, while Andrew has had his involvement in royal affairs significantly reduced amid sexual abuse allegations.

Viscount Stansgate previously told the House of Lords the Regency Act should change now Charles is King.

He said: "Otherwise, are the Government happy to continue with a situation where the counsels of state and regency powers may be exercised by the Duke of York or the Duke of Sussex, one of whom has left public life and the other of whom has left the country?

"Is it not time for the Government to approach the King to see whether a sensible amendment can be made to this Act?"