Rishi Sunak set to BLOCK Nicola Sturgeon's gender self-ID laws in just days

Rishi Sunak is taking legal advice on the laws
Rishi Sunak is taking legal advice on the laws

The Prime Minister met with Sturgeon last week for face to face talks where he outlined his position on the new laws

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Rishi Sunak is set to block Nicola Sturgeon's controversial new gender self-identification legislation in the latest clash between Westminster and the Scottish Government.

The Prime Minister will argue the new law will have an adverse impact on UK-wide equality legislation and can therefore be vetoed.

A final decision will be made by the UK Government next week, according to The Times.

Rishi Sunak and Nicola Sturgeon met for talks last week
Rishi Sunak and Nicola Sturgeon met for talks last week

Last month a new law was voted through Holyrood that would make it easier for people to change their gender.

The legislation allows those wishing to change gender can apply for a certificate from the age of 16 rather than 18, and reduces the time that person must live in their acquired gender.

Critics fear the unintended consequences of the plans, with the law allowing a biological male as young as 16 could change their gender and attend an all girls school.

There had also been fears it would open the doors to "gender tourism", with people travelling to Scotland to obtain a gender recognition certificate (GRC) that they know they would have been unable to attain elsewhere in the UK.

The legislation still needs to be granted royal assent before it can be enforced.

Sunak is expected to use new legal advice on the impact it would have on the rest of the UK to prevent the King from giving his approval to the law.

The Prime Minister met with Sturgeon last week for face to face talks where he outlined his position about the new laws.

"What I’m concerned about is the impact of the bill across the United Kingdom," he told the BBC afterward.

"Once the government has received final advice it will set out next steps."

The Prime Minister said he wanted to work "constructively" with the SNP
The Prime Minister said he wanted to work "constructively" with the SNP

In response to the threats to block the legislation, the Scottish government said: "Any attempt by the UK government to undermine the democratic will of the Scottish parliament will be vigorously contested."

The latest legal clash between the UK and Scottish governments comes after the Supreme Court ruled against the SNP's plans to hold a new independence referendum without Westminster's consent.

In November the court concluded that Sturgeon's plans to hold a vote later this year without approval from the House of Commons was illegal.

The SNP argued the ruling was proof that Scotland's will was being undermined by being part of the United Kingdom.

Following their meeting last week, Sunak said that while he and the Scottish First Minister were "not going to agree on everything" he wanted to work "constructively" with the SNP-led government.