Huge blow for Nicola Sturgeon as 59% of Scots say they want to stay in UK - 'Deeply unhappy with the SNP'

A new poll suggests Scots are growing increasingly dissatisfied with Nicola Sturgeon.
A new poll suggests Scots are growing increasingly dissatisfied with Nicola Sturgeon.

The handling of the NHS, the economy, education, trains, ferries and social care are among key issues the public are concerned by, according to the study.

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Fifty nine percent of Scots want to remain in the UK a new poll has found.

In a blow to First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, most people in Scotland believe the Holyrood government should priorities dealing with public services and disagree with the assertion that the next general election should be a ‘de facto referendum’ on Scottish independence.

The survey found the majority of the Scottish public believe SNP ministers are doing a poor job when it comes to handling public services.

The handling of the NHS, the economy, education, trains, ferries and social care are among key issues the public are concerned by, according to the study.

The poll was conducted by Survation on behalf of Scotland in Union, with 1,025 people aged 16+ in Scotland asked for their views between December 22 and January 1.

Respondents said the SNP-Green government should prioritise the cost of living crisis, with 62 percent saying the issue should be the main cause of concern.

Only eight percent of the poll respondents said an independence referendum should be a priority for the Scottish government.
Only eight percent of the poll respondents said an independence referendum should be a priority for the Scottish government.

Only eight percent said an independence referendum should be a priority issue.

Those who took the poll were mostly sceptical about the benefits of continuing to spend public money on another independence referendum, with only 26 percent of respondents saying they should do so.

The poll comes following the recent UK Supreme Court verdict finding that Holyrood does not have the power to call another referendum without Westminster approval.

Poll respondents who said they voted Yes in the 2014 independence referendum were asked why they would prefer to remain a part of the union now.

Losing faith in the SNP, the economic crisis and dissatisfaction with Nicola Sturgeon were among the popular responses, while some simply said they had changed their minds.

Pamela Nash, chief executive of Scotland in Union, said: “This stark poll shows that the people of Scotland are deeply unhappy with the SNP’s performance running our cherished public services.

“With record waits at A&E and a crisis in GP services, the ongoing ferries scandal, a broken promise on closing the education attainment gap, and endless economic uncertainty, this must act as an urgent wake-up call for Nicola Sturgeon and her ministers as they return to Holyrood.

“It’s time for the people’s priorities in 2023; not the SNP’s priorities.

“The people of Scotland want their government to prioritise the cost of living crisis, the NHS, energy bills, and the economy and jobs.

“The overwhelming majority of voters want to remain part of the UK and only a third believe the next election should be a ‘de facto referendum’ on leaving the UK – demonstrating how out of touch the SNP and Greens have become.”