Anything foreign is celebrated as ‘exotic’, but anything British is denigrated as imperialist, It’s patronising and counter-productive, says Calvin Robinson

Calvin Robinson
Calvin Robinson

With Christianity becoming a minority in the UK, you’d think we’d see the same positive action provided toward other protected minority groups, but alas, that is not the case

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Have you ever noticed how the metropolitan liberal elite seem to love wishing everyone a peaceful Eid Mubarak, happy Diwali and happy Hanukkah but will go out of their way to avoid saying Merry Christmas?

To me, this seems like old-fashioned racism. Anything foreign is to be celebrated as ‘exotic’, but anything British is to be denigrated as imperialist. It’s a patronising attitude, and it’s counter-productive.

With Christianity becoming a minority in the UK, you’d think we’d see the same positive action provided toward other protected minority groups, but alas, that is not the case.

The University of Brighton has issued a statement this week, advising lecturers to avoid the word Christmas, presumably to avoid giving offence.

Has anyone ever actually been offended by the word Christmas? When my friends include me in their religious ceremonies, I find it welcoming; why would the same not be the case for Christianity?

The Sussexes released their Christmas card this week without the word Christmas on it.

Bearing in mind the Duke of Sussex is grandson to the former Defender of the faith, son to the current defender, and brother and uncle to future supreme governors of the Church of England, I found it quite extraordinary to read their “Joyful Holiday Season” card.

Which holiday? Are they off somewhere? It doesn’t work, anyway.

The word holiday is an amalgamation of holy day. The twelve days of Christmas are the holiest of days outside of Easter. 'Happy holy days' is still a subtle jollification.

I used to think this was all hyperbole, “no one is trying to get rid of Christmas”, I’d say. But I now think that’s clearly not the case.

I think there is an overt attempt to take Christ out of Christmas. We see it all around us. Frankly, I’d describe it as sinister and evil.

I don’t think it’s out of a misguided attempt to avoid offending people – it’s simply anti-Christian. Christophobic, if you like.

I think it’s a form of religious intolerance we need to stamp out. Let people celebrate the birth of Our Lord and Saviour with joy – and let us welcome everyone into that wonderful celebration.

Rejoice! O Adonai.