'Young girls are being left at the mercy of grooming gangs in Telford' - victim shockingly reveals

Samantha Smith told Mark Steyn Telford has the highest rate of sex crimes against children of any city in the United Kingdom

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Samantha Smith, a victim of grooming in Telford, has condemned the shocking handling of the child sexual exploitation scandal which ruined the lives of many young girls.

Telford has a population of 157,000 and yet it has the highest recorded rate of child sex crimes in the UK.

Ms Smith outlined horrific figures which revealed, how "18.4 children per 10,000 in Telford against a National rating of 7.9" were subject to child sexual exploitation.

Mark Steyn spoke to victim of CSE in Telford, Samantha Smith
Mark Steyn spoke to victim of CSE in Telford, Samantha Smith

A report into child sexual exploitation in Telford is set to be published later this month, with Ms Smith exclaiming "victims of these crimes are children, the perpetrators are adult men".

Ms Smith was sexually abused for almost a decade by a variety of men across Telford.

She continued stating: "These are not crimes of the past.

"These are not things which have gone away.

"Young girls are being left at the mercy of grooming gangs"

The scandal allegedly began in the 1980s, when predatory abusers began targeting vulnerable girls in Telford, picking them upon on the streets and outside a children's home.

In 2013, the Police launched Operation Chalice which identified 200 men suspected of raping young Telford girls.

Victims of child abuse in Telford have struggle to get justice, with victims Ms Smith stating how Police officers probed her on whether she "asked for consent".

The discussion follows the failed deportation of a ringleader of a Rochdale grooming gang, who remains in the UK following an immigration tribunal.

51-year-old, Abdul Aziz, referred to by the gang as The Master, was told by the Home Office that despite losing an appeal depriving him of UK citizenship, the first step before deportation to Pakistan, he would not in fact lose his citizenship and was allowed to remain in the UK.

Aziz, Adil Khan, 51 and Qari Abdul Rauf, 52, were among nine gang members jailed in 2012 for a catalogue of child sex offences in Rochdale.

The accused were all liable to be stripped of UK citizenship and deported as they also held Pakistani nationality.

The then-Home Secretary Theresa May ruled it would be "conducive to the public good".

Since their release from jail, the gang members have fought a long legal battle against deportation, mounting multiple legal challenges and appeals, lasting several years, arguing how deportation to Pakistan would interfere with their human rights.