WHO chief dubs Ukraine war coverage racist as it 'doesn't give equal attention to black and white lives'

Tedros Ghebreyesus pleaded for the world to "come back to its senses and treats all human life equally"

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The World Health Organisation (WHO) chief has dubbed the Russia-Ukraine war coverage racist as he says other humanitarian crises have only received a “fraction” of the attention.

While acknowledging the global consequences of Vladimir Putin’s invasion, Tedros Ghebreyesus questioned whether “the world really gives equal attention to black and white lives”.

He cited emergencies in the likes of Ethiopia, Yemen and Syria, but noted very little humanitarian aid had been sent.

Mr Ghebreyesus, who is from Ethiopia, said: “I need to be blunt and honest that the world is not treating the human race the same way.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Director-General of the World Health Organisation
Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the Director-General of the World Health Organisation
265 people being evacuated from Afghanistan by supported by the UK Armed Forces
265 people being evacuated from Afghanistan by supported by the UK Armed Forces

“Some are more equal than others. And when I say this, it pains me. Because I see it. Very difficult to accept, but it's happening.”

He said the ongoing civil war in his hometown Tigray, overtaken by Eritrean and Ethiopian forces, is one of the longest in modern history.

He stated that thousands of civilians had been killed with millions are in need of life-saving aid, adding: "I don't even know if that was taken seriously by the media."

Mr Ghebreyesus asked for the world to "come back to its senses and treats all human life equally".

The Director-General of WHO since 2017 said: “As we speak, people are dying of starvation.

“This is one of the longest and worst sieges by both Eritrean and Ethiopian forces in modern history.”

He also critiqued the media for failing to document atrocities in Afghanistan, where the UN say 24 million people needing humanitarian assistance to survive.