Wetherspoon's whistleblower reveals why prices at pub were so cheap

Nearly 900 JD Wetherspoon pubs are scattered across the UK, and are well renowned for their bargain food and drink prices

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A Wetherspoon's worker has spoken out about how prices are kept to a minimum at the popular pub chain.

Nearly 900 JD Wetherspoon pubs are scattered across the UK, and are well renowned for their bargain food and drink prices.

The pub chain was founded by Tim Martin in 1979 and has since become a staple on many high streets.

Many Wetherspoons branches are free to set their own prices.
Many Wetherspoons branches are free to set their own prices.

A secret method used to keep prices low includes workers being sent to local competitors in the area.

Wetherspoon workers would then try and price their beverages below the local average.

Differing drink prices in Wetherspoon's across the country are due to this method being adopted.

The pub chain is notorious for its cheap food and drink.
The pub chain is notorious for its cheap food and drink.
Wetherspoons boss Tim Martin founded the company in 1979.
Wetherspoons boss Tim Martin founded the company in 1979.

Wetherspoon pubs are not owned or leased by a brewery, leaving individual branches free to set their own prices.

Many rival pubs are owned by brewers who charge pub landlords low rent if they buy all their alcohol from them at set prices.

Wetherspoon's, however, own many of their own buildings and are free to buy from anyone they want as a result.

Due to the sheer popularity of the chain, companies are very keen to strike deals with the pub bend so their beverages can be sold.

Wetherspoon's therefore has the freedom to get the cheapest possible prices, allowing them to charge a smaller amount for their drinks.

In Channel 5 show Wetherspoons: How Do They Do It?, former pub manager Craig Henry cited how careful bar staff are when it comes to pouring drinks as another money-saving measure.

Every pint must have a five percent head and this can be measured by weighing the beer.

Ex-staff members reportedly weigh glasses first and are then told by head office what the weight should be with the correct top size.

Drip trays are also emptied each night to get an accurate account of wastage from each line.

Mr Henry explained: "The minimum amount of waste equals the best profit."