Union leaders meeting TOMORROW as they plot to collude and bring UK to a standstill with general strike

Union chiefs are set to meet to plot more ‘co-ordinated action’ as concern grows over the risk of a general strike

Published

Union bosses will be hosted by the Trades Union Congress tomorrow to discuss recent walkouts, Rishi Sunaks’s anti-strike laws and to plot more “co-ordinated action”.

The talks are just a day after unions have sat down with ministers to update their requests following weeks of strike action.

Rail Minister Huw Merriman held talks with train workers earlier today following sustained crippled services, with one in five trains running between Tuesday and Saturday.

Unions including RMT are set to meet to 'compare notes' on industrial action
Unions including RMT are set to meet to 'compare notes' on industrial action

Teaching unions also attended talks with Education Secretary Gillian Keegan ahead of announcements this week over whether their members will go on strike.

While talks between healthcare trade unions and the Government were branded “bitterly disappointing” and an “insult” by unions who have criticised the meeting with Health Secretary Steve Barclay.

Rail groups the RMT and Aslef will join GMB and other unions to “compare notes” on Tuesday to plan their next move.

The Prison Officer Association, who cannot legally strike, has also reportedly been invited.

Hardline civil service PCS union chief Mark Serwotka is said to have called for a general strike at a previous meeting.

The last general strike was in 1926 as chiefs warn the Prime Minister’s crackdown could spark mass walkouts.

The last general strike was carried out in 1926
The last general strike was carried out in 1926

The Trades Union Congress said: “Tuesday’s meeting is one in a series of regular meetings to think about how we best support unions engaged in industrial campaigns.”

GB News Political Reporter Olivia Utley told Stephen Dixon: "A general strike is what No10 and the Government generally is very, very keen to avoid.

"There have been rumours for a while that the unions are in talks about the possibility of a general strike.

"The fact that all of these strikes throughout December and January seem to be timed to coincide with each other has rung some alarm bells in Whitehall brains."