UK is institutionally racist according to senior black scientists after Royal Society report

The report found that 6.5 per cent of black people drop out of research, in comparison to only 3.8 per cent of white students.
The report found that 6.5 per cent of black people drop out of research, in comparison to only 3.8 per cent of white students.

Dr Mark Richards, a researcher at Imperial College said a new Royal Society report shows 'there is an element of racism or structural bias'

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Research culture in the UK is “institutionally racist” according to senior black scientists who have claimed of all the professor posts, they hold only 3.5%.

Manchester University geoscience professor Christopher Jackson told the BBC he believes there is discrimination against black academics in publicly-funded research.

He explained how he believes white scientists think they're so "clever, liberal and progressive' that they don't recognise that 'racism and racists persist within those networks too."

"They are not engaging to give black people the support they need to navigate a system which is often quite alien to them and to tell you about some of the unspoken norms and hidden laws that are in there"

Dr Mark Richards, a researcher at Imperial College said a new Royal Society report shows "there is an element of racism or structural bias."

The report found that 6.5 per cent of black people drop out of research, in comparison to only 3.8 per cent of white students.

It also found that black people account for 1.7 per cent of research staff, in contrast to making up 3.4 per cent of the UK population.

Dr Addy Adelaine, who led an investigation into the UK Research and Innovation agency, called the findings a "kick in the teeth", warning of "closed doors" that leave "no way in to raise the issues that will affect you in your community."

The report found a majority of the £4.3million funding went to white and Asian scientists.

Professor Sir Adrian Smith, the President of the Royal Society who published the report, said "We have global challenges to meet. We need the very best talent and people to be involved.

He added that it was "completely unacceptable".

He also raised concerns over unconscious racism, suggesting professors may be choosing individuals similar to themselves.

Speaking to the BBC, Dr Jazmin Scarlett, a student in volcanology said "I feel almost paranoia that it is because of the colour of my skin. Because the feedback I constantly get has been: 'Your CV is great, you are great in the interview, but there's someone that's got that little bit extra' - and those people have been white.'

"My credentials and my CV and experience for the position are great, but why is it that someone else has been hired instead of me?"