Tube Strike: Talks to be held on Night Tube dispute

Industrial action has taken place over the past two weekends, with further walkouts planned

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Fresh talks will be held on Tuesday in a bid to resolve a dispute over London’s Night Tube which has led to strikes by drivers.

Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) have taken industrial action over the past two weekends, disrupting the return of the overnight service, which had been suspended because of the pandemic.

The union said the onus is on London Underground (LU) following “solid support” for the strikes. Further walkouts are planned in the coming weeks.

The RMT has accused LU of “ripping up” an agreement on Night Tube working, adding it has put forward a suggested deal, including flexibility so that drivers might cover Night Tube shifts on a voluntary basis.

Fresh talks will be held on Tuesday in a bid to resolve a dispute over London’s Night Tube which has led to strikes by drivers.
Fresh talks will be held on Tuesday in a bid to resolve a dispute over London’s Night Tube which has led to strikes by drivers.

LU has called the strikes “unnecessary”, saying agreements have been made with other unions on new rosters, with assurances that there will be no job cuts.

In a new briefing, the RMT said if the action continues much longer, it will soon cost LU more in lost passenger revenue than it would to settle the dispute.

General secretary Mick Lynch said: “RMT has again agreed to meet at Acas today but the ball is firmly in London Underground’s court.

“They need to sort themselves out and stop the posturing because this dispute is eminently sortable.

“The cost of meeting our offer is, in real terms, minimal, whereas if they continue with their current line they will soon have lost more in passenger fares than it would take to train up 200 Night Tube drivers.”

A Transport for London spokesperson said: “We welcome further talks with the RMT so that we can seek to resolve this dispute and avoid further disruption at such a pivotal time for London’s recovery.”

TfL estimated the RMT’s proposals would cost £3.2 million and would push the reintroduction of the remaining Night Tube lines to 2023.