Trophy hunting ban 'counter-productive' and will lead to more animals being killed, firearms dealer tells GB News

Diggory Hadoke added: "I don't enjoy killing animals. I enjoy hunting. Hunting isn’t just killing animals, it's an entire process"

Published

A ban on importing hunting trophies into the UK will actually lead to more animals being killed, a firearms dealer has told GB News.

The Government plans to stop imports of hunting trophies from thousands of endangered and threatened species, including lions, rhinos, elephants, and polar bears.

Speaking late last year, Environment Secretary George Eustice said: “More animal species are now threatened with extinction than ever before in human history and we are appalled at the thought of hunters bringing back trophies and placing more pressure on some of our most iconic and endangered animals.

“This would be one of the toughest bans in the world, and goes beyond our manifesto commitment, meaning we will be leading the way in protecting endangered animals and helping to strengthen and support long-term conservation.”

Environment Secretary George Eustice has been pushing for the ban
Environment Secretary George Eustice has been pushing for the ban

But Diggory Hadoke, who is a hunter himself, has told GB News that the implementation of the proposed legislation would be "counter-productive."

Mr Hadoke said: “First of all, we’ve got to think about what that achieves, there’s no point bringing in legislation of any kind unless we achieve something and I think the whole premise in which its based is a false one.

"It’s chucked in with a great swath of other stuff which I think is actually very sensible. We’ve got things like shark finning and fuagra which are probably good things to oppose.

Diggory Hadoke
Diggory Hadoke

"But to try and throw in the idea that sport hunting aboard is determined to the longevity of the animals that people are trying to focus on is just not true.

“So the effect of bringing in this trophy ban will be counter-productive, the people bringing it in think it will save animals, lead to fewer animals being killed. It won’t, in fact it will actually lead to more animals being killed and more areas being degraded.”

When asked why he enjoys killing animals, Mr Hadoke replied: “I don't enjoy killing animals. I enjoy hunting. Hunting isn’t just killing animals, hunting is an entire process.

“I can’t explain to you now, or convert you into understanding the benefits of hunting as a lifestyle choice to climb a massive mountain.

“But the point here is we’re discussing the conservation benefits or the non-conservation benefits of banning people from doing this and I can show you lots of examples where managed conservation through hunting, which provides value to the animals and money to the people directly leads to conservation outcomes which are positive.”

In the last 50 years, there has been a 60 percent decline in wildlife globally, the Government says.