Transgender police officer inspires children struggling with gender identity to 'follow in her footsteps'

A transgender police officer has inspired children struggling with their own gender identity to “follow in her footsteps”.
A transgender police officer has inspired children struggling with their own gender identity to “follow in her footsteps”.

PC Skye Morden described the hate she received after coming out as an 'avalanche' and like 'swimming through a sea of hate'

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A transgender police officer has inspired children struggling with their own gender identity to “follow in her footsteps”.

PC Skye Morden shared her experience with online hate, describing it as an “avalanche” when she came out and like “swimming through a sea of hate”.

PC Skye Morden described the hate she received after coming out as an 'avalanche' and like 'swimming through a sea of hate'
PC Skye Morden described the hate she received after coming out as an 'avalanche' and like 'swimming through a sea of hate'

West Midlands Police have said that the officer has also triggered a number of emails from parents with children who are struggling with their gender identity, explaining they now want to follow in Morden’s footsteps.

In a new video released as part of Transgender Awareness Week, Morden speaks candidly about coming out as trans, and the hate that was sent to her as a result.

Morden said: “I’m trans, I’ve always known I’m trans, ever since I can remember. Growing up I just pretended to be someone I wasn’t and I hid myself away.”

She continued: “As time progressed, it got to the point where I’d done some research, I started to look into what gender identity was and that the science was there that actually, I’m not mad.

“There is something here, I am trans. So I came out.”

“When I came out and I received the absolute avalanche of hate and abuse, I reached out to the police LGBT network and I found a family.”

Morden said: “I’m trans, I’ve always known I’m trans, ever since I can remember. Growing up I just pretended to be someone I wasn’t and I hid myself away.”
Morden said: “I’m trans, I’ve always known I’m trans, ever since I can remember. Growing up I just pretended to be someone I wasn’t and I hid myself away.”

Reflecting on Morden coming out, Communications Manager Brigg Ford said: “There’s been a lot of hate messages out there, but you can ignore those because the really important messaged are those emails from parents of children who are struggling with their own gender identity.

“Those parents who have reached out to Skye to say ‘what you’ve done has been amazing and it’s really opened my child’s eyes, they want to now follow in your footsteps’ and that’s all thanks to Skye’s work’.

West Midlands Police said: “Having different people from different backgrounds work for us, means that better understand the different people who need our help. It also means our officers and staff can come to work and put all their effort into preventing crime, protecting people and helping those in need, instead of hiding their true, authentic self.”