Tory resignations listed in full as Boris Johnson stands firm despite growing calls to step down

Boris Johnson is to step down as Tory Party leader following a string of high-profile resignations

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So far, the following politicians have resigned from the Government:

Rishi Sunak (Chancellor)

Sajid Javid (Health Secretary)

Brandon Lewis (Northern Ireland Secretary)

Michelle Donelan (Education Secretary)

Simon Hart (Welsh Secretary)

Bim Afolami (Conservative Party Vice-Chair)

Caroline Johnson (Conservative Party Vice-Chair)

Alex Chalk (Solicitor General)

Guy Opperman (Pensions Minister)

Will Quince (Minister for Children and Families)

Robin Walker (Schools Minister)

George Freeman (Science Minister)

Helen Whatley (Treasury Minister)

James Cartlidge (Courts' Minister)

Chris Philp (Technology Minister)

Andrew Murrison (Trade Envoy to Morocco)

David Duguid (Trade Envoy to Angola)

Theo Clarke (Trade Envoy to Kenya)

David Mundell (Trade Envoy to New Zealand)

John Glen (Economic Secretary to the Treasury)

Victoria Atkins (Minister for Prisons and Probation)

Jo Churchill (Minister at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs)

Ed Argar (Health Minister)

Stuart Andrew (Housing Minister)

Kemi Badenoch (Minister for Levelling Up Communities and Minister for Equalities)

Julia Lopez (Minister for Media, Data, and Digital Infrastructure)

Rachel Maclean (Home Office Minister)

Mike Freer (Minister for Exports and Minister for Equalities)

Damian Hinds (Security Minister)

Alex Burghart (PPS)

Craig Williams (PPS)

Mims Davies (PPS)

Neil O’Brien (PPS)

Lee Rowley (PPS)

David Johnston (PPS)

Laura Trott (PPS)

Claire Coutinho (PPS)

Selaine Saxby (PPS)

Jonathan Gullis (PPS)

Saqib Bhatti (PPS)

Nicola Richards (PPS)

Virginia Crosbie (PPS)

Felicity Buchan (PPS)

Mark Fletcher (PPS)

Sara Britcliffe (PPS)

Ruth Edwards (PPS)

Peter Gibson (PPS)

James Davies (PPS)

James Sunderland (PPS)

Jacob Young (PPS)

James Daly (PPS)

Danny Kruger (PPS)

Mark Logan (PPS)

Gareth Davies (PPS)

Duncan Baker (PPS)

After rejecting calls to quit on Wednesday, Boris Johnson is now to step down as Tory Party leader.

He will remain as Prime Minister until a successor is in place, expected to be by the time of the Conservative Party conference in October.

A No 10 source said Mr Johnson spoke to Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the Conservative 1922 Committee, to inform him of his decision.

“The Prime Minister has spoken to Graham Brady and agreed to stand down in time for a new leader to be in place by the conference in October,” a No.10 source said.

Some of the Tory politicians who have resigned from their roles
Some of the Tory politicians who have resigned from their roles
Prime Minister Boris Johnson is refusing to resign
Prime Minister Boris Johnson is refusing to resign

It comes after a further wave of resignations on Thursday morning including Northern Ireland Secretary Brandon Lewis told the PM that he was submitting his resignation with “regret”, but said that a divided Conservative Party cannot win elections.

Mr Lewis, who took over the role in early 2020, told Mr Johnson that the Government had taken “huge strides to level up the economy of Northern Ireland and have not shied away from taking other difficult decisions; confronting the practical issues with the Northern Ireland Protocol, advocating for the reproductive rights of women and championing the benefits of integrated education for all”.

He continued: “A decision to leave Government is never taken lightly, particularly at such a critical time for Northern Ireland. I have taken a lot of time to consider this decision, having outlined my position to you at length last night.

His resignation was quickly followed by Treasury minister Helen Whately, who told the PM there “are only so many times you can apologise and move on”.

It comes after a host of Tory politicians tendered their resignations in the last two days, including former Health Secretary Sajid Javid and ex-Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak.

Among those to quit on Wednesday included former schools standards minister Robin Walker and children and families minister Will Quince.

Mr Quince said he could not accept being sent out to defend the Prime Minister on television with inaccurate information over the Mr Pincher row.