Tommy Robinson being chased for £2m debt after declaring bankruptcy

Robinson, real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, owes a refugee boy who he accused of attacking a young girl, as well as HMRC, a former business partner and a local council

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Creditors owed approximately £2m by EDL founder Tommy Robinson have called on an independent insolvency expert, Heath Sinclair of Richard Long & co, to recover what they're owed.

Last March Robinson declared himself bankrupt.

Robinson, whose real name is Stephen Yaxley-Lennon, was in July ordered to pay £100k to a refugee boy, Jamal Hijazi, who he incorrectly claimed had attacked a girl.

Syrian schoolboy Jamal Hijazi, 17, arrives at the Royal Courts of Justice, London, where he is suing English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson.
Syrian schoolboy Jamal Hijazi, 17, arrives at the Royal Courts of Justice, London, where he is suing English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson.

The legal costs for the boy's lawyers are estimated to be £1.5m, which Robinson also is due to pay.

The deadline for these payments is March this year.

Robinson had claimed Hijazi had attacked "young English girls" at school in Huddersfield, however he failed to convince the High Court of these claims.

Other parties owed money by Robinson include HMRC, an ex-business partner and Barrow-In-Furness Borough Council.

Hope not Hate, an anti-facism group, is currently raising funds to finance the independent insolvency expert.

If the expert fails to locate any money or assets by the 3rd March that Robinson may be concealing, then he won't have to pay all the money owed.

The expert has power to order search warrants if necessary.

Jenna Lennon, the ex-wife of Robinson, divorced in February 2021.

This was prior to him declaring himself bankrupt.

Tommy Robinson gestures outside the Royal Courts of Justice, London, for the libel case brought against him by Jamal Hijazi.
Tommy Robinson gestures outside the Royal Courts of Justice, London, for the libel case brought against him by Jamal Hijazi.

Hope Not Hate believe Robinson may have access of up to £3m worth of assets earned through property, as well as donations and book revenue.

The group think Robinson's ex-wife's property could be worth £1.2m alone.

The BBC reported that Hope Not Hate's chief executive Nick Lowles said is group were supporting the boy as his encounter with Robinson turned his "life upside down."

It added: "Jamal and his family had to move, had to start all over again, got all sorts of threats.

"It just seems outrageous that the person who did that, and then lost a libel case, can walk away scot-free.

"So partly it's about holding him to account and giving some justice to Jamal.

"We need to demonstrate to him and others there are consequences for doing this. You cannot get away with making people's lives a misery, creating lies, dividing communities, whipping up hatred, inspiring others to do attacks and not be held accountable for your actions, and I think for us this is a way to hold him to account."