TB sweeping through Russian frontline as men aged SIXTY forced to fight Ukraine

Vladimir Putin is continuing his Ukraine offensive.
Vladimir Putin is continuing his Ukraine offensive.

In an intercepted phone call, the bleak conditions of the warfront were exposed

Published

A conversation between a Russian soldier and his mum has laid bare the grim reality of the conditions of the frontline in the Ukraine war.

An intercepted phone call, between a soldier in the Luhansk Oblast of Ukraine and his mother, reveals soldiers are being forced to go without food for days at a time.

Corpses are also said to be being left to rot, as the soldier told his mother that he is “in the worse hell.”

One soldier is also said to have started spitting up blood and developed tuberculosis (TB) as a result of the conditions.

In the leaked call, the soldier says: “F***, such a sh***y attitude towards the people here.

“We have one corpse lying around and no one is getting it out.”

He continued, adding: “The battalion commander doesn’t give a s***.”

When asked whether he is being fed well, he said: “No, they don’t give us canned food, they don’t give us anything.

“We eat what we can find. Some men don’t eat for two days while another unit is eating, some have ulcers and one has TB now, he started spitting blood.

“The Pskov guy, who I came with… The battalion commander said it’s a 20km drive to the village and from the village some walk to the hospital, he said ‘go on foot'.

"And people are going, I don't understand it... Men are 50, and 60 years old, what do they want? They thought they came to a resort? So, we have these walks."

In a show of support to Ukraine, Rishi Sunak yesterday visited the country to reaffirm the UK’s position.

Rishi Sunak said he was “humbled” to be in Ukraine, as the Prime Minister held his first face-to-face meeting with President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Rishi Sunak paid Ukraine a visit.
Rishi Sunak paid Ukraine a visit.

The visit came as the prime minister, in office only a matter of weeks, pledged continued British support to the war-torn country in the fight against Russia.

Mr Sunak’s arrival was accompanied by the announcement of a £50 million package of defence aid comprising 125 anti-aircraft guns and technology to help Ukraine counter Iranian-supplied drones, including radars and anti-drone technology.

The visit came after a week that saw tensions between the West and Russia ratchet up, after a missile hit a Polish village close to the Ukrainian border and sparked concerns Russia had struck a Nato member state.

Tensions have eased since by the likely attribution of the hit to Ukrainian defence forces, but Russian missile strikes on the country have shown no sign of relenting.

In Kyiv, Mr Sunak laid flowers at a memorial for the war dead and lit a candle at a memorial for victims of the Holodomor famine, before meeting emergency personnel at a fire station.

He said it was “deeply humbling” to be in Kyiv, and he said he was “proud” of how the UK had backed Ukraine since the beginning of the war.