Surgeon plans to transplant womb into trans woman in world-first operation

Reproductive organs from a dead donor or patient who has transitioned the other way and had theirs removed will be used for the procedure

Published

A surgeon in India will undertake the radical task of attempting to transplant a womb into a trans woman who was born a man, with the aim of making them pregnant.

Reproductive organs from a dead donor or patient who has transitioned the other way and had theirs removed will be used for the procedure.

Only one case of a womb being inserted into a trans woman has been documented, but they died from complications just months later.

Impregnating a trans woman would be even more of a landmark operation, and will make use of IVF and a C-section, as they do not have a fully functioning vagina.

Dr Narenda Kaushik has expressed optimism over the project.
Dr Narenda Kaushik has expressed optimism over the project.

Dr Narendra Kaushik, who runs a gender reassignment clinic in New Delhi, has expressed optimism over the project.

"Every transgender woman wants to be as female as possible — and that includes being a mother," he is quoted as saying in The Mirror.

"The way towards this is with a uterine transplant, the same as a kidney or any other transplant. This is the future. We cannot predict exactly when this will happen but it will happen very soon."

Womb transplants cost around £50,000 while just one cycle of IVF treatment can reach over £5,000.
Womb transplants cost around £50,000 while just one cycle of IVF treatment can reach over £5,000.

The surgeon has not revealed who the patient will be or any timeframe for the operation but insists "we have our plans and we are very, very optimistic about this".

Womb transplants cost around £50,000 while just one cycle of IVF treatment can cost over £5,000.

Dr Kshuik's clinic, Olmec, is riding the wave of a prospering industry in New Delhi which has seen the area rival Bangkok as the world's sex change capital.

He says around a fifth of his customers are from abroad, with many flying in from the UK, despite gender reassignment times being free on the NHS.

Getting the procedure on the NHS is, however, subject to waiting times.

"Many of our patients tell us that their sexual partners don't even notice that they weren't born with female sex organs," Dr Kaushik told the paper.

"And that's our aim, to make it so that they live as normal a life as possible as a woman. We aim for an aesthetic ideal."