Suella Braverman says officers should not face 'politically correct' distractions in police conference speech

Ms Braverman said the public want the police to be 'tackling crime, not debating gender on Twitter'

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Home Secretary Suella Braverman told police chiefs at a conference in Westminster she did not want officers to face “politically correct” distractions.

Ms Braverman said: “The way to ensure public confidence in the police is to focus on getting the basics right.

“What I call ‘common sense policing’. The kind of policing the law-abiding majority deserves and expects.

“No politically correct distractions, just good old-fashioned policing – with a relentless focus on making our streets, homes and transport networks safer.”

Suella Braverman
Suella Braverman
Home Secretary Suella Braverman told police chiefs she did not want officers to face “politically correct” distractions
Home Secretary Suella Braverman told police chiefs she did not want officers to face “politically correct” distractions

She praised the chief constable of Greater Manchester Police Stephen Watson, saying he “rejects woke policing”.

Ms Braverman continued: “Our police officers’ time is precious and the public want the police to be tackling crime, not debating gender on Twitter.

“I have asked my officials to revisit the issue of non-crime hate incidents as a first step, as I want to be sure that we are allowing you to prioritise your time to deal with threats to people and their property.”

Addressing police concerns about bureaucracy around crime recording and dealing with non-police issues such as mental health crises, she added: “I am concerned that crime recording requirements can be seen as too complex and burdensome.

“I am committed to working with the police to see how recording can be simplified without compromising on putting victims first.

“I also want to see policing and the National Health Service work better together to support individuals experiencing acute mental health distress so that people in need of medical help get the right care at the right time, while also reducing inappropriate demand on policing.”