Striking rail workers could be SACKED under new laws being planned by Rishi Sunak

Industries striking would still have to supply minimum levels of service so that the country is not brought to a standstill

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Striking rail workers have been warned they could be sacked under new laws being planned by Rishi Sunak.

The Prime Minister could set out details of a new law to prevent further strikes as soon as Thursday, saying ministers intend to make industrial action illegal in some sectors if minimum service levels are not met.

According to The Times, the legislation would mean industries striking would still have to supply minimum levels of service so that the country is not brought to a standstill.

It would enforce minimum service levels in six sectors, including the health service, rail, education, fire and border security, which would require a proportion of union members to continue working.

The UK has been battered by strikes in recent months with businesses crippled by fewer customers walking through their doors.

One coffee shop owner spoke to Isabel and Martin on GB News about the hardship facing him and his workers at the moment.

One coffee shop owner spoke to Isabel and Martin on GB News about the hardship facing him and his workers at the moment.
One coffee shop owner spoke to Isabel and Martin on GB News about the hardship facing him and his workers at the moment.

Ashley Davis said: “We're closed for four weeks. It has a huge impact on the business and the cash flow. Putting jobs at risk, putting my business at risk. We haven't got loads of money sitting around and the cost of the last four weeks is, to us, £42,757. It's a phenomenal amount of money for a small business that only opened six months before Covid.

“All the other businesses we talk to regularly, we know them well, they will close as well, having the same financial hits as we are.”

Asked his opinion of those striking, Ashley continued: “We support their right to strike. It definitely helps. We just want people to think when they are making that decision to ballot, to strike, think about us, think about the small businesses that are suffering a financial loss.

“We don't have access to these funds that the RMT have to support their workers through strike action. We have twelve employees. Their jobs are on the line at this point. We can't sustain another strike like this. The business will collapse.”

Under Sunak’s planned legislation, the strikes would be illegal unless those in the companies striking were able to supply the minimum level of service.

This would mean employers could sue unions or sack staff if they fail to comply.

Responding, Sir Keir Starmer said if he came into office he would repeal the laws.

He said: ”We'll look at what they bring forward, but if it's further restrictions, then we will repeal it,”