SAS bans nicknames such as ‘Doris’, ‘Ruperts’ and ‘Crabs’ because they can be offensive

A memo has reportedly been sent to officers despite some saying the nicknames are used as 'banter'

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The SAS has reportedly banned nicknames such as “Doris”, “Ruperts” and “Crabs” over fears they could be deemed offensive.

Soldiers have now been urged to stop calling female personnel “Doris”, while calling officers “Ruperts” is also being banned.

Crabs is often a word used to members of the RAF because their outfits supposedly draw similarities to the colour of a blue ointment used to get rid of lice.

The nicknames have been defended by some within the SAS, with one person describing them as “banter”.

The SAS have banned nicknames such as “Doris”, “Ruperts” and “crabs” over fears they could be deemed offensive
The SAS have banned nicknames such as “Doris”, “Ruperts” and “crabs” over fears they could be deemed offensive

The source said: “The SAS thrives on banter as they have to do a lot of nasty stuff and it’s their way of dealing with it.

“They rely heavily on supporting units and although they use nicknames when dealing with them.

"It doesn’t mean there is no respect.

“It goes both ways. We could end up at war with Russia.

“Most soldiers have more to worry about than playful name-calling,” as quoted by the Mirror.

But despite the claims of banter, a memo from senior figures has now called for the nicknames to be banned.