Rwanda: Darren McCaffrey visits the Hope Hostel in Kigali which will home migrants sent from the UK

Though many questions remain, not least of all - will anyone ever arrive?

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The Hope Hostel, in the heart of Kigali, Rwanda’s capital has a sign at its front gate “You come as a guest but leave as a friend”.

It is this Commonwealth country’s very deliberate way of signifying its welcome approach to migrants from across the world. It is already home to more than 120,000.

But it is controversial partnership with the UK, a plan to house refugees who have crossed the English Channel and have been transported here, which has lead us to the Hope Hostel.

The Hope Hostel, in the heart of Kigali, Rwanda’s capital has a sign at its front gate “You come as a guest but leave as a friend”.
The Hope Hostel, in the heart of Kigali, Rwanda’s capital has a sign at its front gate “You come as a guest but leave as a friend”.
The facility has 50 rooms and can accommodate 100 people, two per room.
The facility has 50 rooms and can accommodate 100 people, two per room.

The authorities are keen to show off the facility which has 50 rooms and can accommodate 100 people, two per room. In theory they would spend 9 months at the hostel before being integrated into Rwandan society.

There is little doubt the staff are welcoming, the accommodation is bright and spacious, with lots of the facilities and good views of the city.

Many of the signs are in different languages and prayer rooms have been set aside as well as computer points.

Though many questions remain, not least of all - will anyone ever arrive.

The accommodation is bright and spacious, with lots of the facilities and good views of the city.
The accommodation is bright and spacious, with lots of the facilities and good views of the city.
Prayer rooms have been set aside as well as computer points.
Prayer rooms have been set aside as well as computer points.

Attempts to transport people here simply haven’t taken off with last minute legal challenges, not least of all from the European Court of Human Rights stalling Home Office attempts to deport people earlier this month.

The government, the Prime Minister, is insistent the policy will succeed but what if it doesn’t?

We know the government has already paid the Rwandan authorities £120 million pounds, it is unlikely we will claw any of that back if no-one makes it here.

But even if they do, will this policy act as a deterrent - will it in the end stop people making that desperate journey across the English Channel.