Rishi Sunak cleared of breaching ministerial code over family tax affairs and US green card

Sunak referred himself for investigation after it emerged his wife, Akshata Murty, held non-domiciled tax status – exempting her from paying UK tax on overseas earnings

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Rishi Sunak has been cleared of breaching the ministerial code by Boris Johnson’s standards adviser after considering the tax affairs of the Chancellor’s family.

Ministerial interests adviser Lord Geidt also ruled in Mr Sunak’s favour over allegations of conflicts of interest relating to the Chancellor having held a US permanent resident card.

Mr Sunak referred himself for investigation after it emerged his wife, Akshata Murty, held non-domiciled tax status – exempting her from paying UK tax on overseas earnings.

Mr Sunak referred himself for investigation after it emerged his wife, Akshata Murty, held non-domiciled tax status – exempting her from paying UK tax on overseas earnings.
Mr Sunak referred himself for investigation after it emerged his wife, Akshata Murty, held non-domiciled tax status – exempting her from paying UK tax on overseas earnings.

He said he was confident he had acted appropriately at all times, but his “overriding concern” was that the public should have confidence in the answers.

In advice to the Prime Minister, Lord Geidt wrote: “I advise that the requirements of the ministerial code have been adhered to by the Chancellor, and that he has been assiduous in meeting his obligations and in engaging with this investigation.

“In reaching these judgments, I am confined to the question of conflicts of interest and the requirements of the ministerial code. My role does not touch on any wider question of the merits of such interests or arrangements.”

Earlier this week the Shadow Chancellor said a future Labour government would abolish so-called “non-dom” statuses as part of an overhaul designed to make Britain’s tax system fairer.

Prime Minister's standards adviser, Lord Geidt
Prime Minister's standards adviser, Lord Geidt

Rachel Reeves said she wanted to reform the rules on non-domiciled status to prevent those who had made a long-term home in Britain from being able to avoid paying UK tax on their overseas income for up to 15 years.

Labour said it would replace the status with a system whereby those genuinely only residing in the UK for short periods could take advantage of a scheme preventing them from paying tax on their overseas income and gains.