Renters expected to receive new important protection against landlords tomorrow

The current rules mean landlords can throw their tenants out with eight week’s notice, without giving any reason

Published

Renters are expected to be given new rights which will protect them against landlords evicting them without providing any reason for doing so.

Such evictions, known as “no fault” evictions, are set to feature in the Queen’s Speech tomorrow.

The current rules mean landlords can throw their tenants out with eight week’s notice, without giving any reason.

Boris Johnson's Conservative Party pledged to abolish rules allowing "no fault" evictions during the 2019 general election.

“No fault” evictions are set to feature in the Queen’s Speech tomorrow
“No fault” evictions are set to feature in the Queen’s Speech tomorrow
The Government has previously pledged to change the rules
The Government has previously pledged to change the rules

In the pledge, they said: "Private landlords will no longer be able to evict tenants from their homes at short notice and without a good reason.”

The Government has been facing growing pressure from campaigners to change the regulations.

One campaign group, the Renters' Reform Coalition sent a letter to the PM on the subject, which read: "With the rising cost of living, additional pressure is being placed on renters of all ages and backgrounds.

"Rapidly rising rents are squeezing household budgets and pushing ordinary people further from the dream of home ownership.

"The end of Coronavirus Act protections means that, until section 21 is repealed, renting families live in fear that requests for repairs could be met with an eviction that uproots their lives and adds further financial strain."

Evictions were banned during the Covid-19 pandemic, but have since been resumed.