Relatives of David Fuller's mortuary victims will get up to six-figure compensation sum after he sexually assaulted over 100 bodies

David Fuller is questioned by police.
David Fuller is questioned by police.

The hospital worker was convicted of abusing mortuary bodies

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Relatives of victims of David Fuller will receive compensation under a new Government scheme, it has been announced.

The hospital worker was convicted of abusing mortuary bodies.

Over 90 family members of the victims could be receiving compensation as a result of the scheme, which will be administered by the NHS Resolution on behalf of Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust.

Fuller was convicted of murdering two women in 1987 and of abusing 78 deceased women in mortuaries at Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust between 2008-2020 after he admitted to all crimes.

A tiered approach will be adopted, with three levels of compensation available to the family members of the victims.

All qualifying family members will receive at least £7,500 with the ability to claim and additional £5,000 - £25,000 for psychiatric trauma.

A third tier, relating to financial losses, is also available.

The scheme will ensure compensation is paid to relatives as soon as is practical.

Minister Maria Caulfield said: “My sincerest sympathies are with the families of all the victims of David Fuller. These were horrific events and the independent inquiry we have launched will help ensure this never happens again.

Relatives of victims of David Fuller will receive compensation under a new Government scheme.
Relatives of victims of David Fuller will receive compensation under a new Government scheme.

“Today is an important step and families will benefit from what has been announced today.

“Thank you to NHS Resolution, Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust and the families’ representatives for your collaboration in developing this compensation scheme.”

In order to ensure all eligible family members are aware of the scheme, it will be advertised nationally.

In November 2021, an independent inquiry was announced by the government in the wake of the case, to understand how Fuller was able to operate undetected by the hospital trust, and to look at the national implications of his offences. The independent inquiry, led by Sir Jonathan Michael, is ongoing. A report on the trust is expected to be published next year.