Putin poised to have even tighter grip on Europe's energy as 148 new mines in grasp after Ukraine move

Russia launched a "full-scale invasion" on Ukraine on Thursday morning

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Vladimir Putin looks poised to tighten his grip on Europe’s energy system after launching a "full-scale invasion" of Ukraine.

Russia began the attack on its neighbours on Thursday morning, with blasts being seen and heard across widespread parts of the country.

The conflict could devastate Ukraine and cause huge economic damage across Europe, which is heavily dependent on Russian energy.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has launched a "full-scale invasion" of Ukraine
Russian President Vladimir Putin has launched a "full-scale invasion" of Ukraine

Putin's vast energy stocks could also soon be strengthened given Russia's ongoing invasion of Ukraine.

Ukraine is home to 148 coal mines, 95 of which exist in areas that are outside the control of the Kyiv government.

And the Donbass region is known to be a key area for this industry.

The mines in that region are responsible for 65 percent of the population's wages but as many as 19 are in the process of being shut for safety reasons.

Shelling from conflict as well as an inability to pump out the flooded areas have also caused some of the mines to close.

The equipment used by Ukrainian miners is seen as inadequate for the job, only adding to issues of safety.

But the same problems do not exist in Russia, making the country an attractive target for the Kremlin.