Putin explodes in fit of rage as he publicly humiliates Russia's deputy PM for Ukraine war failures

The Russian president demoted General Sergei Surovikin, who took the job just three months ago.
The Russian president demoted General Sergei Surovikin, who took the job just three months ago.

The Russian President made changes to his war cabinet as the country's efforts to invade Ukraine dwindled

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Vladimir Putin has made more changes to his war cabinet, humiliating one of his deputy prime ministers in the process as Russia continues to lose momentum in its attempts to take over parts of Ukraine.

The Russian president demoted General Sergei Surovikin, who took the job just three months ago.

He was in charge of leading Russia’s invasion and was in charge of heavy attacks on Ukraine's energy infrastructure.

Chief of the General Staff Valery Gerasimov was made overall commander despite some blaming him for military setbacks during Russia’s ongoing attack on Ukraine.

During a video call Putin also exploded at one of his deputy prime ministers, accusing him of “fooling around” after they failed to obtain civilian and military planes.

During his three months in charge, Surovikin was credited with bringing in a campaign to knock out public utilities in Ukraine to put pressure on the country.

He also oversaw Russia’s withdrawal from the only regional centre the military had managed to capture, giving up Kherson in November.

The move was seen as a humiliation for Russia and is likely the main reason for his demotion.

During a video call Putin exploded at one of his deputy prime ministers, accusing him of “fooling around” after they failed to obtain civilian and military planes.
During a video call Putin exploded at one of his deputy prime ministers, accusing him of “fooling around” after they failed to obtain civilian and military planes.

On Thursday, Ukraine’s Deputy Defence Minister Hanna Malyar said Russia is building up its forces in Ukraine but that Ukrainian forces are holding out in fierce fighting for the eastern town of Soledar.

She told a news briefing that the number of Russian military units in Ukraine had risen to 280 from 250 a week earlier as Moscow tried to gain the "strategic initiative".

"Fighting is fierce in the Soledar direction," Malyar said. "They (the Russians) are moving over their own corpses."

"Russia is driving its own people to the slaughter by the thousands, but we are holding on," she said.