Puppies shown being smacked and kicked by staff in shocking footage filmed in doggy day care centre

Puppies were filmed being hit and slapped at Mucky Pups Doggy Day Care by a former member of staff

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A father and daughter have been sentenced after a revolting video revealing abuse at a doggy day care centre appeared on social media.

Puppies were filmed being hit and slapped at Mucky Pups Doggy Day Care by a former member of staff.

Lauren Walker and her dad John Walker later confessed to animal welfare offences after an investigation.

Lauren owned the business in Rishton, Lancashire, and hired her father to work there, Burnley Magistrates’ Court heard.

A former member of staff made a complaint to the RSPCA in December 2019 after filming John hitting the dogs.

The footage was later shared on social media.

John pleaded guilty to causing excessive suffering to seven dogs between September 10, 2019, and November 19, 2019.

The 69-year-old, of Greenhill, Great Harwood, also confessed to failing to to ensure the demands of the animals were met between August 1, 2019, and December 18, 2019.

Lauren, 31, of Knowles Street, Rishton, pleaded guilty to failing to stop unnecessary suffering by her father to protected animals.

Both have now been prohibited from holding a council animal welfare licence, meaning that they are unable to run a similar business.

The father was given a 10-year ban, while Lauren was handed a five-year ban.

An independent vet, who studied the footage said: “The videos illustrate a dog day care centre caring for a number of dogs. In particular an adult male member of staff can be seen interacting with the dogs on a number of occasions. In some of the videos the adult male can be seen to physically strike a number of dogs with his hand.

“In the first video for example the adult male individual restrains a black Labrador type dog by holding the dog’s collar with his left hand while he strikes the dog 3 times with his right hand. The dog vocalises and the male throws the dog away using the collar. The body language of the dog is fearful submission with no aggression.

“In my opinion the actions of the adult male individual have been sufficiently influential on the welfare of some of these animals to the extent that has caused them to experience suffering.”