Pub chain offering 6p pints today to celebrate the Platinum Jubilee

Greene King is offering pints for the price of a beer during the Queen's ascension to the throne in 1952

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A British pub chain is offering 6p pints today to celebrate the Platinum Jubilee.

Brewery Greene King has launched the scheme to coincide with the average price of a pint in 1952 during the Queen's ascension to the throne.

Punters wanting to take advantage of the deal will need to use the codeword 1952.

More than 400 Greene King pubs around the country will be taking part in the scheme.

Andrew Gallagher, marketing director at Greene King Local Pubs, said: "The Platinum Jubilee is a fantastic way for the UK to come together and celebrate our Queen and country, so we wanted to take our customers back to where it all began - 1952, a time when Vera Lynn ruled the charts and pints were only 6p.

Pint of beer
Pint of beer

"We can't wait to see our customers enjoy this royally good deal on Monday 30 May, and look forward to celebrating the platinum jubilee in all our pubs across the bank holiday weekend."

This comes after councils have warned Britons not to put up bunting for fear of it damaging council vehicles.

A minister has urged councils to show “a little bit of flexibility” when it comes to issuing licences for street parties to celebrate the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee.

Technology minister Chris Philp spoke about councils warning the public against hosting unauthorised Platinum Jubilee street celebrations this week.

More than 70,000 Big Jubilee Lunches are planned in the four UK nations over the weekend, with an expected 10 million people set to sit down with their neighbours on June 5, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) previously said.

Mr Philp told Sky News: “I think it is fantastic we are celebrating the Queen’s Jubilee, and I would just say to local councils around the country, including mine in Croydon, if you do get a late application, and maybe the deadline has technically passed, I would just say to the councils to show a little bit of flexibility, show a little bit of willingness to accommodate people.

“And if you are at all able to, please do grant these requests, even if they are maybe technically after the deadline.”

Some councils which have required permission for people to hold street parties have already seen their deadlines pass.

Barnet Council in north London is one local authority which urged residents to apply if they wanted to hold a street party. The deadline for an application was April 8.

The Royal Borough of Greenwich Council, in south-east London, also required residents to register their parties before March 25.