Princess Beatrice can now be a stand in for King Charles III as she moves up line of succession

The line of succession has changed following the death of Queen Elizabeth II

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Princess Beatrice can now be classed as a stand-in for King Charles III as 'counsellor of the state' after her move up the succession line, prompted by Queen Elizabeth II's death.

The five senior royals who will act as Counsellors to the new monarch has changed after the monarch died in Balmoral Castle on Thursday, September 8.

Prince Andrew's eldest daughter became the ninth in line to the throne and can take on the King's duties were he to suffer with an illness or travel abroad, according to The Times.

The law states that those able to stand-in for the monarch include the Queen Consort, and the next four people over the age of 21 in the line of succession.

Princess Beatrice could be in line to caretake head of state duties.
Princess Beatrice could be in line to caretake head of state duties.

Beatrice, 34, is the fourth in line to the throne aged over 21 so can take over the royal duties, despite being ninth in line overall.

The other royals that can also be put in the position as things currently stand are Camilla Queen Consort, Prince William, The Duke of Sussex and the Duke of York.

The line of succession has changed following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.
The line of succession has changed following the death of Queen Elizabeth II.

Other royals ahead of Beatrice in the succession line, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, Prince Louis and Lilibet are all under the age of 21 and therefore cannot undertake the head of state duties.

Beatrice married Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi in 2020 and has a daughter Sienna, who is tenth in the line of succession.

Counsellors of state are rarely called upon but in May, the King and Prince William stood in for the Queen Elizabeth II at the state opening of Parliament.

Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II, thousands of people are paying their last respects after Westminster Hall was officially opened to the public.

A queue of people almost three miles long started moving gradually forward on Wednesday as well-wishers saw the monarch lying in state from 5pm.

The line has the capacity to stretch for 10 miles, but there is no guarantee that everyone who joins it will get to file past the coffin.

Nevertheless, people turned out in droves for the opportunity to say a personal farewell ahead of Queen Elizabeth II's funeral on Monday.