Prince Harry called 'Duke of Wessex' in UN speech gaffe

The Duke of Sussex had only just left the stage moments before the blunder played out

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Prince Harry was the subject of a gaffe after his UN General Assembly speech as a fellow speaker called him the "Duke of Wessex".

The Duke of Sussex, 37, hit out at the state of play in US politics by criticising the "rolling back of constitutional rights" during his speech which marked Nelson Mandela Day.

The next speaker, Omar Hilale, who is President of the African Group at the United Nations, harped back to a comment made by Harry but appeared confused by the Duke's title.

Moments after Harry concluded his speech, Mr Hilale referred to him as the "Prince Duke of Wessex".

Omar Hilale mistakenly called Prince Harry the 'Duke of Wessex' during his speech.
Omar Hilale mistakenly called Prince Harry the 'Duke of Wessex' during his speech.
Prince Harry addressed the threat of climate change during his speech.
Prince Harry addressed the threat of climate change during his speech.

The Prince's official title is the Duke of Sussex, while his uncle, Prince Edward, is the Duke of Wessex.

Mr Hilale was the first speaker to take to the stage after Harry and made reference to a comment made by the Duke.

He said: "And as it has been just said by Prince Duke of Wessex, every day, not only one day a year, everybody has the ability and responsibility to change the world for the better."

Mr Hilale is Morocco's Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York, who took up the post after being appointed in April 2014.

Harry used his speech to warn about the impact of climate change on Africa and the world.

He said: "This crisis will only grow worse, unless our leaders lead, unless the countries represented by the seats in this hallowed hall make the decisions – the daring, transformative decisions – our world needs to save humanity."

Accompanied by his wife Meghan Markle, the couple held hands as they walked into UN headquarters in New York City to mark Nelson Mandela International Day, held annually on the former South African president's birthday.

In the UN General Assembly hall, Harry spoke about the threats from Russia's invasion of Ukraine, what he called the reversal of constitutional rights in the United States and the "weaponising" of lies and disinformation.

He said: "We are witnessing a global assault on democracy and freedom – the cause of Mandela's life."