Prince Charles regency claims unfair as 'we're putting too much' on 96-year-old Queen, royal expert says

Robert Jobson believes Prince Charles should be "expected to carry out the jobs for the Queen now"

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Claims that Prince Charles has made an unofficial start to a regency are unfair, a royal expert has told Dan Wootton on GB News.

The Prince of Wales stepped in for the Queen for the State opening of Parliament for the first time earlier today, with Her Majesty struggling with mobility issues.

Some royal commentators have claimed that today’s speech marks an unofficial start to Charles’ regency.

But Robert Jobson has told GB News that far too much pressure is being put on the Queen.

Robert Jobson speaking to Dan Wootton Tonight about Prince Charles
Robert Jobson speaking to Dan Wootton Tonight about Prince Charles
Her Majesty missed the Queen's Speech earlier today
Her Majesty missed the Queen's Speech earlier today

Mr Jobson said: “They may be jumping the gun a little bit, the fact is the Queen has mobility issues.

“I understand her knees are playing up and her ankles are playing up.

“She’s straggling a bit with her mobility yes, but that doesn’t mean she can’t carry out engagements with the job that she does.

“I must admit I feel that we are putting too much on 96-year-old women, I really do.

“You’ve got to have some humanity here, yes she’s the Queen and she said she’d reign until she dies.

“But she’s the longest serving monarch, she’s the oldest monarch we’ve ever had.”

He continued: “You’ve got to remember that Queen Victoria was about 82 when she passed away, this is the realms that we’re dealing with.

“I think it's time, not necessary for a regency because that is totally within the gift and decision of Her Majesty and Parliament etc.

"But I do think Prince Charles should just be expected to carry out the jobs of the Queen now so we don’t have every time she has to pull out of an engagement, we get the world’s media.

“Everyone, it’s not just the UK media, but the world’s media are saying: 'What’s wrong with the Queen?' 'Is she ill?' That’s got to stop.

“I think the best thing to do: That is to say the Queen is not retiring, she’s not abdicating, she’s putting her feet up, she’s 96.”