Prince Charles 'has to be extraordinarily careful' not to get too involved in politics, royal expert tells Nigel Farage

GB News presenter Nigel Farage posed the question: "Is Prince Charles fit to be king?"

Published Last updated

Royal expert Michael Cole said Prince Charles should be "extraordinarily careful" when he becomes monarch, referencing his previous involvement and interest in controversial political issues.

Referencing the Queen's apolitical nature, commending her for her refrained stance in UK politics, Nigel added how he feared Charles would not follow suit.

Outlining his involvement in political issues such as climate change and the recent slavery speech he gave at the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting, Nigel probed Mr Cole on whether it would be possible for the prince to avoid getting involved in politics.

Michael Cole spoke with GB News presenter Nigel Farage about whether Prince Charles is fit to be king
Michael Cole spoke with GB News presenter Nigel Farage about whether Prince Charles is fit to be king
Mr Cole emphasised how Prince Charles must be 'extraordinarily careful' with his political views when he is monarch
Mr Cole emphasised how Prince Charles must be 'extraordinarily careful' with his political views when he is monarch

Mr Cole added how the future monarch should be surrounded by people who "can actually see these tiger traps and make sure he walks around them, rather than straight into them".

Emphasising Charles' long involvement in the Royal Family, shadowing the Queen from the age of four, Mr Cole added: "He should know the ropes by now."

The conversation between the pair follows reports that the Prince of Wales accepted €3million (£2.5million) in cash from a billionaire Qatari sheikh.

It has been reported that Charles accepted three donations between 2011 and 2015 from former Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber al-Thani - known as "HBJ".

One donation, totalling €1million (£862,000) was reportedly handed over in a small suitcase and another was stuffed in a carrier bag from Fortnum & Mason.

The cash, reportedly counted by aides of Charles and then collected by Coutts bank, was paid into the Prince of Wales's charitable fund which aims to "transform lives and build sustainable communities" through awarding grants.

Despite no suggestion of any illegality, or that Charles offered anything in return for the generous donations, critics said it raised serious concerns about the future monarch's judgement, given Qatar's human rights record.

Clarence House said in a statement: “Charitable donations received from Sheikh bin Jassim were passed immediately to one of the prince’s charities, who carried out the appropriate governance and have assured us that all the correct processes were followed.”