Prince Andrew tests positive for Covid-19, Buckingham Palace confirms

The Duke of York will no longer attend the Jubilee service of thanksgiving

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Prince Andrew has tested positive for Covid-19 and will no longer attend tomorrow's Jubilee service of thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral, Buckingham Palace said.

A palace spokesman said: “After undertaking a routine test the Duke has tested positive for Covid and with regret will no longer be attending tomorrow’s service.”

It is understood Andrew saw the Queen in the last few days but has been undertaking regular testing and has not seen her since he tested positive.

Prince Andrew has tested positive for Covid-19
Prince Andrew has tested positive for Covid-19
Andrew will no longer attend the Jubilee service of thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral
Andrew will no longer attend the Jubilee service of thanksgiving at St Paul’s Cathedral

The news comes after Andrew reportedly missed Trooping the Colour today, following the settlement of sexual assault claims with his accuser.

The Prince, who usually attends the event as colonel of the Grenadier Guards, riding out by the Queen's side as the regiment's representative, was snubbed from the event.

Andrew was stripped of his title the Duke of York earlier this year, and since has reduced his active participation in the Royal Family.

Speaking earlier this week, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby urged people to "step back a bit" from Andrew, adding that he was "seeking to make amends".

Mr Welby said: “Forgiveness really does matter. I think we have become a very, very unforgiving society. There’s a difference between consequences and forgiveness.

“I think for all of us, one of the ways that we celebrate when we come together is in learning to be a more open and forgiving society.

“Now with Prince Andrew, I think we all have to step back a bit. He’s seeking to make amends and I think that’s a very good thing.

“But you can’t tell people how they’re to respond about this. And the issues of the past in the area of abuse are so intensely personal and private for so many people.

“It’s not surprising. There’s very deep feelings, indeed,” he told ITV.