Plans to house hundreds of asylum seekers in Linton-on-Ouse abandoned

Locals said the plans to house up to 1,500 men at the former RAF base would destroy village life and could jeopardise the safety of local people

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Controversial plans to house hundreds of asylum seekers at a former RAF base next to a Yorkshire village have been abandoned, GB News can confirm.

Villagers in Linton launched a high profile campaign to halt the plans when they were announced in April.

Locals said the plans to house up to 1,500 men at the base would destroy village life and could jeopardise the safety of local people.

A former RAF base in Linton-on-Ouse
A former RAF base in Linton-on-Ouse
Villagers launched a high profile campaign to halt the plans when they were announced in April
Villagers launched a high profile campaign to halt the plans when they were announced in April

Hambleton District Council, the local authority in the area, prompted a temporary halt to the proposals when it announced possible legal action if the Home Office continued with its plans.

Speaking on GB News’ Mark Steyn in May, Kevin Hollinrake, Conservative MP for Thirsk and Malton claimed the plans could “treble the size of the village”.

Mr Hollinrake said: “I think it’s a disgraceful choice of site, I think the Home Office has looked at the site, the accommodation as an RAF base, I think the accommodation there could eb suitable for purpose.

“But the site itself is entirely unsuitable.

“This is an open site, it’s not a detained site,

“The village itself has 600 people, this is effectively trebling the size of the village.

“1,500 young, single men from around the world who are there for up to six months can freely walk around that village.

“You can understand the concern and indeed panic from people in that village.

‘”Its absolutely wrong that a single village should be sacrificed on the altar of a national policy priority, it's simply wrong."

The proposals formed part of the Government’s renewed drive to deal with the growing crisis of Channel migrants which has now reached more than 18,500 so far this year.

Another controversial proposal to send asylum seekers to Rwanda for processing has also been mired in legal challenges and shows no sign of being enacted any time soon.

A Government spokesperson said: “The Government is steadfastly committed to tackling illegal migration and stopping dangerous small boat crossings.

“The Government will continue to identify appropriate sites for Greek-style asylum reception centres which will play a key role in reducing the number of asylum seekers in hotels which cost the taxpayer more than £5million each day.”