'PAINFUL to watch' - Joe Biden stutters through 'humiliating' Cop27 speech

The US President took to the stage in Egypt pledging to 'turbocharge' the clean energy economy

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Joe Biden is facing criticism for his Cop27 speech as he struggled to utter the words given to him by his teleprompter.

The US President took to the stage in Egypt pledging to "turbocharge" the clean energy economy.

His point, however, will have been lost on many as he struggled to articulate his words in front of other world leaders.

People have taken to Twitter to make their opinions known about the US President, who is believed to be drawing up plans with advisors about a run for a second term, ahead of the 2024 election.

Joe Biden speaks at the Cop27 summit.
Joe Biden speaks at the Cop27 summit.

GB News' Darren Grimes said: "This is painful to watch. There is no way in hell this man is running again."

Another Twitter user commented: "He shouldn't run again in 2024. He can barely walk now, and even when he does it's in the wrong direction."

Joe Biden greets the crowd at the Cop27 summit.
Joe Biden greets the crowd at the Cop27 summit.

A third simply stated: "Humiliating."

Some have defended the speech, saying "U.S. is acting at home and abroad: Balanced and concrete commitments in longer than expected speech by the POTUS".

Another user commented: "Excellent speech. I totally agree."

The 79-year-old was discussing how a transition to a low-carbon future could be made "more affordable".

"The climate crisis is about human security, economic security, environmental security, national security, and the very life of the planet," Biden said, before outlining steps the United States, the world’s second-biggest greenhouse gas emitter, was taking.

"I can stand here as president of the United States of America and say with confidence, the United States of America will meet our emissions targets by 2030," he said

His speech was intended to remind government representatives gathered in Sharm el-Sheikh to keep alive a goal of keeping the global average temperature rise within 1.5 degrees celsius to avert the worst impacts of planetary warming.

It came even as a slew of crises - from a land war in Europe to rampant inflation - distract international focus.

Prior to his arrival, Biden’s administration sought to set the stage by unveiling a domestic plan to crack down hard on the U.S. oil and gas industry’s emissions of methane, one of the most powerful greenhouse gases, in a move that defied months of lobbying by drillers.

Washington and the EU were also planning to issue a joint declaration on Friday pledging more action on oil industry methane, building on an international deal launched last year and since signed by 119 nations to cut economy-wide emissions 30% this decade.