Over a million expected in London for first Pride march since pandemic began

Organisers are calling it the 'most inclusive event in history'

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More than a million people are expected to descend on the capital for Pride in London on Saturday.

It will be the first time the event has been held since the outbreak of the pandemic and is the 50th anniversary of the UK’s first ever Pride parade.

The event, which organisers are calling the “biggest and most inclusive event in history”, will also feature a line-up of artists performing across four stages around Central London.

Commencing at midday on Saturday from Hyde Park Corner, the parade will pay homage to the 1972 march, passing significant sites from the UK’s first LGBT+ movement. The parade will run through until 6pm, finishing at Whitehall Palace.

A rainbow flag is held aloft as the Pride in London parade makes its way through the streets of central London in 2016.
A rainbow flag is held aloft as the Pride in London parade makes its way through the streets of central London in 2016.

Over 600 LGBT+ community groups will join the march which so far has 30,000 people registered overall.

Popstar Ava Max will close the show on the Trafalgar Square stage. Other performers in the line-up will include Emeli Sande, Eurovision-winner Netta, Samantha Mumba and Kat Graham.

People take part in the Pride in London Parade in central London.
People take part in the Pride in London Parade in central London.

All proceeds raised from commercial partnerships are reinvested into the LGBT+ community, such as through the Unity Fund, organisers said.

The Unity Fund aims to build stronger communities by providing one-off grants to grassroots organisations, which address the needs of the UK’s LGBT+ community.

Meanwhile, public health officials have urged people not to attend Pride events if they have monkeypox symptoms or feel unwell.