One in four delaying having CHILDREN because of fears about climate change - 'Mankind is to blame'

A study has found that a quarter of Americans have put life plans on hold over fears of climate change
A study has found that a quarter of Americans have put life plans on hold over fears of climate change

Research has found that one in four have put off having children and other life plans over concerns about climate change

Published

A quarter of Americans are delaying long-term plans such as starting a family in fear that climate change will cause more weather calamities.

According to a survey, a growing number of people are concerned about global warming with four fifths calling it a “real” phenomenon and nearly two thirds blaming it on mankind.

The results come after at least 17 people were killed following storms and flooding in California.

Devastating flooding has hit parts of California
Devastating flooding has hit parts of California

In recent days, rescuers searched for five-year-old Kyle Doan, who was swept away by water on the central coast near San Miguel on Monday.

Frederic Van Heems, the firm’s president said the survey of 1,002 people in the US has highlighted a “sense of urgency” over climate change.

Just 14 per cent of those surveyed said there was “nothing to worry about”.

While a quarter of respondents described “not being at peace” due to global warming and were “giving up on long-term projects such as having children”.

Other studies have shown that Americans increasingly consider floods, hurricanes and heatwaves when deciding on where to buy new homes.

But a 10-year study of migration by the University of Vermont revealed that many people still relocated to areas damaged by wildfires.

California has suffered costly weather disasters
California has suffered costly weather disasters

California’s winter tragedy follows a year of costly weather disasters in the US with 18 climate extremes that caused at least $1billion in damage.

Two thirds of people who participated in the study said pollution was a “serious and immediate threat”.

More than half said people had to change “live more frugally and put in place technological solutions to reduce climate disruption” according to the report.