Obese people to lose free fitness coaches and weight loss apps as Government cuts funding

A Government plot will see £100million of funding allocated to the 'Living with Covid' plan

Published

A funding diversion from the Government is set to deny access to fitness coaches and weight loss apps for obese people, it was warned on Thursday.

A Government plot will see £100million of funding allocated to the 'Living with Covid' plan.

The strategy will be funded from existing Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) budgets, meaning other funding streams have been revised and reallocated, reports The Telegraph.

Healthy weight activities will therefore see a reduction in funding for the upcoming financial year.

Cuts have been made in other areas, with some £400million in Covid outbreak support funding for local councils also cut, according to The Telegraph.

The DHSC outlined plans to help people reach and maintain a healthier weight last year, with a £100million fund being at the centre of the strategy.

Image: PA
Image: PA
Image: PA
Image: PA

Some £70million of the fund was given to the NHS and local councils in order to provide access to weight loss groups or fitness coaches for adults.

A further £30million was used to fund access to free weight loss apps and marketing campaigns.

The news comes as Boris Johnson has defended measures to help reduce Britain's obesity problem.

In an exclusive interview with GB News, the Prime Minister told Conservative MPs Esther McVey and Philip Davies that there is '36 percent' more obesity in the UK post-Covid.

The Prime Minister said: "Do you know how much fatter we are post-Covid?

"I think there's 36 percent more obesity, there's been a huge increase in obesity.

"Before the thing began we were already the fattest nation in Europe with the exception of the Maltese.

"That is a massive charge on the taxpayer. The taxpayer is coughing up huge quantities for the consequence of that obesity.

"I'm no advertisement for will power, we need to recognise the effects of obesity on our taxes."

It is estimated that overweight and obesity-related conditions cost the NHS £6.1billion each year.