Nigel Farage drops biggest hint yet that he'd make a return to politics

The GB News presenter says he would contest a parliamentary seat if the country’s voting system changes

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Nigel Farage has dropped his biggest hint yet that he'd make a return to politics.

The GB News presenter says he would contest a parliamentary seat if the country’s voting system changes.

He slammed the current first past the post method and called for the UK to implement proportional representation.

Speaking to an audience at The Bitcoin Conference in Amsterdam - where he will broadcast his nightly GB News show 'Farage' - Nigel predicted Labour would bring in the change if they win the next general election under current leader Sir Keir Starmer.

He said: “I think in the UK’s, the electoral system, the first pass the post, constituency by constituency - what’s it given us?

“Twelve years of utterly useless Tory government. And I think the whole thing needs a shake-up.

“I suspect we will get a Labour government under Starmer.

“There'll be a fair contingent of the Liberal Democrats in there as well.

“And I think we will then get a form of proportional representation. And as soon as we get that, we'll see a very different kind of politics.”

Referring to his campaigns under the Brexit Party and UKIP, he continued: “I won the 2014 and the 2019 European elections - the second one by a landslide.

“I won two national elections that were contested under PR but on the first pass the post - four million votes, only one seat.

“And I think when we get proportional representation, we'll see people back in politics with real convictions.

“Who knows, I might even give it another go myself.”

First past the post is currently used in the UK for general elections.

Under that system, voters cast their ballot for the MP who represents their area with each party putting up a representative.

The candidate with the most votes wins.If the party has 50% of the seats in the House of Commons it can form a government and its leader becomes Prime Minister.

This tends to generate two large parties - as small parties without a geographical base find it hard to win seats.

UK Parliament’s website describes proportional representation as: “The distribution of seats corresponds closely with the proportion of the total votes cast for each party.

“For example, if a party gained 40% of the total votes, a perfectly proportional system would allow them to gain 40% of the seats.”

Tune in to Farage Monday-Thursday from 7pm only on GB News