Nigel Farage accuses of MPs of 'burying their heads in the sand' for not linking social housing with migration

MPs entered a five-hour debate on levelling up, with the shortage of housing high up on the agenda

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Nigel Farage has slammed MPs for failing to link the lack of social housing to net migration during a debate in Parliament.

Following Prime Minister’s Questions earlier today, MPs entered a five-hour debate on levelling up, with the shortage of housing high up on the agenda.

But no member of the debate made the connection between the housing problems with migration, much to Nigel’s bemusement.

Speaking on GB News, Nigel said: “After PMQs today, Parliament entered into a five-hour debate on levelling up and in particular on a shortage of housing.

Nigel Farage
Nigel Farage
MPs entered a five-hour debate on levelling up earlier today
MPs entered a five-hour debate on levelling up earlier today

“Not one member of Parliament in a five-hour debate made the connection or link between the lack of social housing in this country and the fact that net migration means we need to build 750 new every single day.

“Not one MP has made the connection between the population that has risen by 10 million since Tony Blair came to power and the number of houses we need to build, and the fact a million people are on the social housing waiting list.

“That’s our MPs for you, their heads buried in the sand.”

Earlier today, a housing market expert warned that any extension of the Right to Buy scheme could risk eroding the supply of affordable housing further.

Reports suggest Government officials have been considering how to help young people struggling to get on to the property ladder in England.

There has been speculation that Right to Buy could be extended for housing association residents and a wave of modular or “flatpack” homes could also be built.

The proposal for renters to be able to purchase their social homes at a discounted price is not new, and the bid to revive the plans has been pitched as being inspired by former prime minister Margaret Thatcher giving council tenants the right to buy in 1980.

But Lawrence Bowles, director of research at Savills, said: “Every iteration and pilot of Right to Buy has failed to replace the number of affordable homes lost.”