NHS interview panels made to explain why they have hired white candidate over person from ethnic minority - 'It's a tick-box exercise!'

NHS bosses are making interview panels justify why they have hired a white person instead of someone from an ethnic minority.
NHS bosses are making interview panels justify why they have hired a white person instead of someone from an ethnic minority.

The policy does not apply the other way round and has caused upset within the NHS

Published

NHS bosses are making interview panels justify why they have hired a white person instead of someone from an ethnic minority.

The Royal Free in London asks staff to complete reports in which they must explain why the chosen candidate was “more suitable” for the job role.

NHS interview panels are being made to explain why they have hired white candidate over person from ethnic minority
NHS interview panels are being made to explain why they have hired white candidate over person from ethnic minority

The report which is sent to the NHS chief executive must also explain how the candidate from an ethnic minority was scored and suggest improvements for next time, commenting on how they could “develop their experience, skills, or amplitude”.

However, the policy does not apply the other way round.

The policy has been enforced since 2018 with senior staff members and recently expanded to the whole trust.

If the report is not sent to chief executive Caroline Clarke within ten working days the staff member will be put in the Workforce Race Equality progress report.

The policy has been enforced since 2018 with senior staff members and recently expanded to the whole trust.
The policy has been enforced since 2018 with senior staff members and recently expanded to the whole trust.

Speaking to the Daily Mail, a source said: “It feels like a tick-box exercise. When we discuss who the best applicant was after the interview, it’s not about their ethnicity.

“So justifying your decision based on where they might be from does take a lot of time because you have to revaluate your decision from a completely different perspective, based on race rather than ability.”

They went on to suggest the policy should be enforced for all candidates, no matter of their race.

Responding, a spokesperson from the Royal Free London said: “We are committed to having a diverse workforce and we seek to ensure all candidates, irrespective of their ethnicity, have equal opportunities to work at the Royal Free London.”